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Next year’s RAG conference will take place at the East London Mosque and London Muslim Centre, Whitechapel Road,E1, on Tuesday 5 May 2015.The provisional title is ‘Archives of World Faiths within the UK’.

After the success of last year’s call for papers, we have decided to repeat the same format: to invite proposals for talks or presentations lasting 20 minutes for the afternoon session of the conference. We would like to widen participation in RAG and are particularly keen this year to attract submissions from those working with the archives of non-Christian and Christian faiths which do not have a long established history of record keeping within this country.

Proposals on the following topics would be particularly welcome:

* Experiences of religious organisations setting up new archives or developing existing services
* Relationships between record offices and depositors of religious archives
* Community projects with an historical or archival element
* Interaction between modern archival theory and faith-based record keeping traditions
* Archives of interfaith organisations or projects

We are usually able to pay reasonable travel expenses within the UK and speakers will get free access to the conference and lunch. Anyone working or researching in religious archives is welcome to participate and there is no need to be a member of RAG.

Please submit a proposal of no more than 300 words as well as your full name, position, contact details and details of your institution to Claire Childs, RAG Conference Organiser (clairelchilds@gmail.com<mailto:clairelchilds@gmail.com>) by Monday 29 December 2014.

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1st Call for Papers

eRemembrance or eOblivion?

International Conference on the Society’s Memory Functions in the Digital World

 

Organized by the Doctoral Programme Memornet, University of Tampere, Finland

Tampere 23-24 November, 2015

Invitation

Memornet is a doctoral programme and a research network for the society’s memory functions in Finland. It brings together both academia and memory institutions (libraries, archives and museums) to promote research and research education in the field.

To complete its four year period 2012-15 Memornet shall organize an international conference on the society’s memory functions in the digital world.  We invite researchers to submit papers and propose panels or other sessions.

Conference Themes

The thematic focus of the Conference is on various aspects of digitization in the Society’s Memory functions. The themes include but are not limited to

  • Society’s memory functions and institutions, e.g.

o   Memory institutions as place and space

o   Making national past

  • Cultural heritage and its preservation, e.g.

o   Effects of file migration in digital preservation

o   Risks in cultural heritage preservation

  • Users of and access to digital resources, e.g.

o   Usability, accessibility and evaluation

o   Integrating access through discovery portals

  • Digitalization, organization and use of research data, e.g.

o   Digital infrastructures in field studies

o   Management of data life cycle

  • Organizational and collective memory, e.g.

o   Corporate Memories in Action

o   Organizing records

Submissions

The organizers encourage the submission of high quality research papers and proposals for scholarly panels and other sessions. All submissions and proposals should be in English.

Full papers

Contributions should not be previously published or should not be under review for another conference or journal. Submissions will be reviewed by at least two members of the programme committee on the basis of the originality of the research presented in relation to the conference themes, clarity of presentation, the quality of the theoretical contribution made by the research, the validity and rigour of the methodology chosen, the significance of the results presented and the overall contribution to the understanding of memory functions. Research papers containing at most 5,000 words should be submitted as a Word-document using a special template (see http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf/submissionguidelines.html).

Short papers

Short papers should be submitted following the instructions for full research papers, but should contain at most 3,000 words. As a general rule, short papers are used for presenting works in progress (see http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf/submissionguidelines.html).

Panels or alternative sessions

The conference welcomes also panels and other sessions for informal scholarly or professional discussions under the conference themes. The proposal should include:

  • Type of event
  • Title of event/session
  • Short Abstract: Approximately 800 words
  • Organizer(s): Names and affiliations of the organizers
  • Length: Recommended length between 45 and 90 minutes.
  • Who should be interested?
  • Purpose, goals and expected outcomes
  • Special requests/equipment needs

Proposals will be reviewed by the programme committee.

Publishing

The conference proceedings will be published on an open access forum.

How to submit?

All submissions are delivered by email to memornet@uta.fi.

Schedule

  • July 31st, 2015: full and short papers due
  • August 15th, 2015: proposals for panels etc. due
  • August 31st, 2015: notification of acceptance
  • September 30th, 2015: final camera-ready papers

More information

Queries regarding submissions and the conference overall should be directed to the Memornet coordinator Samuel Ranta  (memornet@uta.fi).

See also homepage http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf.html

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CALL FOR PAPERS

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

 

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

 

A collaborative conference between The National Archives, Research Libraries UK and Arts Council England, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

 

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

 

Conference Brief

 

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

 

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by 1st July 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

 

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

To examine methods of ensuring the discoverability of material as a means of mapping collections. What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

 

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

 

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

 

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

 

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

 

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

 

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

 

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

 

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

 

Conference Essential Details

 

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

 

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

 

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

 

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

 

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required. Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK. A charge applies to attend the Conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1). More information and details regarding registration will be posted here shortly: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/visit/events-elsewhere.htm

 

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CALL FOR PAPERS – please circulate

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

A collaborative conference between The National Archives and Research Libraries UK, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

Conference Brief

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by Monday 30th June 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

What methods and resources exist to enhance the discoverability of material? What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word proposals for workshops stating their purpose, remit and intended audience. Workshops can explore specific issues relating to discoverability (e.g. bibliometrics) or broader topics (e.g. whether there’s scope for a national collecting strategy across the archival sector).

The deadline for proposals is Monday 30th June 2014. Proposals should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

Conference Essential Details

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required (to be announced). Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK.

A charge applies to attend the (optional) conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1) to be held at the Library. Details and costs of the evening reception will be released at registration.

 

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Digital Cultures: future thinking and innovation for arts and heritage
Monday 19 May 20149.30-4.30
Discovery Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne  


Produced by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums and Thinking Digital Arts
Formerly known as Bits2Blogs, Digital Cultures is an annual conference for anyone working in the arts and heritage sectors that is passionate about experimenting with new ideas and new technologies to inspire new audiences.

Digital Cultures will feature a range of thinkers from the cultural and digitalcreative sectors sharing innovative approaches to public engagement. Talks will explore open data and reuse cultures,co-curation, mobile and gaming technologies, interdisciplinary collaboration, the power of play, and will investigate the impact of creative technologies and the rise of digital industries on arts and heritage.

The final programme will be published very soon. The following speakers are confirmed:
Nora McGregor – Digital Curator in the Digital Scholarship Department (British Library)
Annette Mees – Co-Director (Coney)
Dr Noel Lobley – Sound Curator and Ethnomusicologist (Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford)
Irini Papadimitriou – Digital Programmes Manager (V&A)
Martha Henson – (Freelance Digital Producer/Science Museum)
Dominic Wilcox Artist and Designer (Dominic Wilcox.com)
Olga Mink Director (Baltan Labs)
John Bowers- Professor of Creative Digital Practice (Culture Lab, Newcastle University)
Marialaura Ghidini- Curator and Founder Director (Or-bits)
Beryl Graham – Professor of New Media Art at the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media, University of Sunderland (CRUMB)
More info and tickets from our Eventbrite here- http://bit.ly/1gG0jKY
A LIMITED NUMBER OF EARLY BIRD TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT THE SPECIAL RATE OF £40 (plus booking fee)

 

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Under threat? Charity archives in the 21st century

Matthew McMurray (Royal Voluntary Service) and Philip Gale (The National Archives)

Institute of Education, 22 May 2014, 12.30-14.00

The records of voluntary sector organisations provide a unique perspective on social problems and social policy that is of value to voluntary sector staff, trustees and volunteersas well as to researchers and historians.

Yet, with ever growing pressure on Trustees to deliver their charity’s purpose in the most cost effective manner the archives of these organisations are in many cases marginalised, poorly resourced and even under the threat of disposal and destruction.

This talk by Matthew McMurray, archivist of Royal Voluntary Service and author of a new report on charity archives, will outline current evidence about voluntary sector archives in the UK based on his new research. Matthew’s talk will be followed by a response from Philip Gale of the National Archives.The seminaroffers a chance for wider discussion and exchange of ideas and information on the topic.

Venue: Library Teaching Room, Newsam Library and Archives, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

All welcome to this free event, but as places are limited please register in advance by emailing g.brewis@ioe.ac.uk

The event is organised in association with the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives, an initiative launched in 2012.

More information: http://www.ioe.ac.uk/newsEvents/97367.html

 

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Event:

There are still a few places left on the next Copyright course being run by ARA Core Training, to be held 22 May in Cambridge. See details below:

Copyright in Practice
Perplexed by publication requests? Frightened of infringement?
If you’re wondering how best to navigate your way through a sea of copyright concerns, this could be just the course for you. The ARA Eastern Region is hosting a Core Training day on this very subject. Join us on Thursday 22 May, at Churchill College, Cambridge from 10am till 4pm (registration begins at 9.30am).

The morning session will cover current and forthcoming changes in legislation and how these will impact on archive services. The focus of the afternoon will be on practical examples from the region with talks on dealing with copyright at a college archive, issues with literary manuscripts and a case of infringement. Later, attendees will have the chance to work through some case studies before the day closes with a question and answer session with our panel. Our speakers will be Tim Padfield, Robert Athol, Chris Bennett and Richard Hunt.

Places cost £25 for ARA members and £40 for non-members (please note lunch is not included)

To book a place, please use the online booking form at http://www.archives.org.uk/events/viewevent.html?eventid=280 and quote the course code ‘C2014/002’. There are a total of 30 places available. The deadline for booking is Friday 9 May.

Bursaries may be available for those enrolled on the Registration Scheme. Please see http://www.archives.org.uk/registration-scheme/bursary-support.html for more information.

Course Programme

09.30 Registration (refreshments provided)
10.00     Welcome (introduction)
10.05 Understanding Copyright in Archives – Tim Padfield
12.00 – 1.00 Lunch (not provided, delegates can buy lunch at the Churchill College canteen or bring their own)
1.00 Copyright at Clare College – Robert Athol, Clare College, Cambridge
1.30 The John Clare Archive –  Richard Hunt, Peterborough City Archives
2.00 Copyright Infringement: a practical case study – Chris Bennett, Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies
2.30 Case studies workshop
3.00 Tea break (refreshments provided)
3.15 Discussion of case studies –   with Tim Padfield
3.45 Question and Answer session – with Tim, Robert, Richard and Chris
4.00 Close

 

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