Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘call for papers’

Next year’s RAG conference will take place at the East London Mosque and London Muslim Centre, Whitechapel Road,E1, on Tuesday 5 May 2015.The provisional title is ‘Archives of World Faiths within the UK’.

After the success of last year’s call for papers, we have decided to repeat the same format: to invite proposals for talks or presentations lasting 20 minutes for the afternoon session of the conference. We would like to widen participation in RAG and are particularly keen this year to attract submissions from those working with the archives of non-Christian and Christian faiths which do not have a long established history of record keeping within this country.

Proposals on the following topics would be particularly welcome:

* Experiences of religious organisations setting up new archives or developing existing services
* Relationships between record offices and depositors of religious archives
* Community projects with an historical or archival element
* Interaction between modern archival theory and faith-based record keeping traditions
* Archives of interfaith organisations or projects

We are usually able to pay reasonable travel expenses within the UK and speakers will get free access to the conference and lunch. Anyone working or researching in religious archives is welcome to participate and there is no need to be a member of RAG.

Please submit a proposal of no more than 300 words as well as your full name, position, contact details and details of your institution to Claire Childs, RAG Conference Organiser (clairelchilds@gmail.com<mailto:clairelchilds@gmail.com>) by Monday 29 December 2014.

Read Full Post »

1st Call for Papers

eRemembrance or eOblivion?

International Conference on the Society’s Memory Functions in the Digital World

 

Organized by the Doctoral Programme Memornet, University of Tampere, Finland

Tampere 23-24 November, 2015

Invitation

Memornet is a doctoral programme and a research network for the society’s memory functions in Finland. It brings together both academia and memory institutions (libraries, archives and museums) to promote research and research education in the field.

To complete its four year period 2012-15 Memornet shall organize an international conference on the society’s memory functions in the digital world.  We invite researchers to submit papers and propose panels or other sessions.

Conference Themes

The thematic focus of the Conference is on various aspects of digitization in the Society’s Memory functions. The themes include but are not limited to

  • Society’s memory functions and institutions, e.g.

o   Memory institutions as place and space

o   Making national past

  • Cultural heritage and its preservation, e.g.

o   Effects of file migration in digital preservation

o   Risks in cultural heritage preservation

  • Users of and access to digital resources, e.g.

o   Usability, accessibility and evaluation

o   Integrating access through discovery portals

  • Digitalization, organization and use of research data, e.g.

o   Digital infrastructures in field studies

o   Management of data life cycle

  • Organizational and collective memory, e.g.

o   Corporate Memories in Action

o   Organizing records

Submissions

The organizers encourage the submission of high quality research papers and proposals for scholarly panels and other sessions. All submissions and proposals should be in English.

Full papers

Contributions should not be previously published or should not be under review for another conference or journal. Submissions will be reviewed by at least two members of the programme committee on the basis of the originality of the research presented in relation to the conference themes, clarity of presentation, the quality of the theoretical contribution made by the research, the validity and rigour of the methodology chosen, the significance of the results presented and the overall contribution to the understanding of memory functions. Research papers containing at most 5,000 words should be submitted as a Word-document using a special template (see http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf/submissionguidelines.html).

Short papers

Short papers should be submitted following the instructions for full research papers, but should contain at most 3,000 words. As a general rule, short papers are used for presenting works in progress (see http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf/submissionguidelines.html).

Panels or alternative sessions

The conference welcomes also panels and other sessions for informal scholarly or professional discussions under the conference themes. The proposal should include:

  • Type of event
  • Title of event/session
  • Short Abstract: Approximately 800 words
  • Organizer(s): Names and affiliations of the organizers
  • Length: Recommended length between 45 and 90 minutes.
  • Who should be interested?
  • Purpose, goals and expected outcomes
  • Special requests/equipment needs

Proposals will be reviewed by the programme committee.

Publishing

The conference proceedings will be published on an open access forum.

How to submit?

All submissions are delivered by email to memornet@uta.fi.

Schedule

  • July 31st, 2015: full and short papers due
  • August 15th, 2015: proposals for panels etc. due
  • August 31st, 2015: notification of acceptance
  • September 30th, 2015: final camera-ready papers

More information

Queries regarding submissions and the conference overall should be directed to the Memornet coordinator Samuel Ranta  (memornet@uta.fi).

See also homepage http://www.uta.fi/memornet/en/conf.html

Read Full Post »

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

 

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

 

A collaborative conference between The National Archives, Research Libraries UK and Arts Council England, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

 

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

 

Conference Brief

 

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

 

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by 1st July 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

 

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

To examine methods of ensuring the discoverability of material as a means of mapping collections. What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

 

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

 

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

 

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

 

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

 

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

 

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

 

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

 

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

 

Conference Essential Details

 

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

 

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

 

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

 

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

 

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required. Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK. A charge applies to attend the Conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1). More information and details regarding registration will be posted here shortly: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/visit/events-elsewhere.htm

 

Read Full Post »

CALL FOR PAPERS – please circulate

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

A collaborative conference between The National Archives and Research Libraries UK, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

Conference Brief

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by Monday 30th June 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

What methods and resources exist to enhance the discoverability of material? What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word proposals for workshops stating their purpose, remit and intended audience. Workshops can explore specific issues relating to discoverability (e.g. bibliometrics) or broader topics (e.g. whether there’s scope for a national collecting strategy across the archival sector).

The deadline for proposals is Monday 30th June 2014. Proposals should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

Conference Essential Details

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required (to be announced). Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK.

A charge applies to attend the (optional) conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1) to be held at the Library. Details and costs of the evening reception will be released at registration.

 

Read Full Post »

Archival Science

 

 

Call for Papers

Special Issue on ‘Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving’

 

 

Guest Editors:

 

Ben Alexander, Queens College, City University of New York

 

Andrew Flinn, University College London, University of London

 

 

Although archiving the records of political activism, particularly grassroots activism, is not a new practice, it has often been a controversial and contested process resulting in informal and autonomous activist archival endeavours as well as collections in more orthodox higher education and other local and national specialist archival repositories. In recent years the collection, preservation and the promotion of the use of activist collections for historical research and for ‘social justice’ or ‘human rights’ struggles has become increasingly prevalent in the formal archival sector as well as amongst the growing numbers of independent and autonomous archival endeavours. This explicit alignment with political activism and social justice objectives is not without its critics within the recordkeeping profession, but the archiving of activism and an activist archival approach goes beyond notions of the ‘active archivist’ and instead embraces an understanding of archival practice as (by its very nature) a form of social, cultural, and political activism. Although not necessarily synonymous, these developments come at a time when notions of a more active, collaborative and participatory archival practice are gaining currency in the professional archival world, sharing perhaps an understanding of the power of the democratisation of the production and creation of knowledge.

 

 

Accordingly, this special issue of Archival Science “Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving” will explore the varied connections between contemporary archival practice and activism in many different contexts (national, political, socio-economic, technological, autonomous and formal). This special issue will be guest edited by Ben Alexander, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at Queens College, The City University of New York benjamin.alexander@qc.cuny.edu and Andrew Flinn, Department of Information Studies, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University College London, a.flinn@ucl.ac.uk. Questions about the special issue can be direct to Drs. Alexander and Flinn.

 

 

Suggested topics for papers may include:

 

 how do mainstream archives and archivists work to preserve activist struggles of the past (such as the civil rights movement in the American South, struggles for equality and against discrimination, radical political movements of the left and right as well as across divided and antagonistic communities);

 

 how the constitution of archives and the active ‘use’ of the past history is considered by archival activists to be a core component of their political activities;

 

 how global moves to ensure preservation and use of the documentation of social and political atrocities (including genocide, human rights abuses and repressive regimes) in Truth and Reconciliation, criminal tribunals and other social justice processes has increasingly

 

 involved archivists as key active participants in on-going struggles for Human Rights and

 

Justice.

 

 the impact of technology in promoting the collection, sharing and use of activist histories and for promoting a sense of a more collaborative and participatory approach to the production of ‘useful’ knowledge

 

 the implications of a social justice or human rights orientation to archival practice for the traditional professional adherence to political neutrality

 

 

Key Dates

 

Submission Deadline for completed papers: May 16, 2014

 

Submission instructions

 

Papers submitted to this special issue for possible publication must be original and must not be under consideration for publication in any other journal or conference. Previously published or accepted conference/workshop papers must contain at least 30% new material to be considered for the special issue (for workshops 50% new content is required). Submissions should be made online via the Editorial Manager System at http://www.editorialmanager.com/arcs/.

 

During submission please select article type “SI: Archiving Activism”. All manuscripts must be prepared according to the journal publication guidelines which can also be found on the website http://www.springer.com/10502. Papers will be reviewed following the journal standard peer review process (double-blind).

 

Read Full Post »

ICA Annual Conference 2014, Girona, Spain, 13-15 October 2014: Call for presentations


The ICA 2014 Annual Conference Joint Programme Committee is seeking presentations from speakers who can lead ICA members and stakeholders in debates on the following themes:
Cultural and creative industries, and strategies of collaboration with archives
Actions and initiatives
Archives and web portals
Access to information
Digital repositories and authenticity preservation in the Cloud
Open data projects
Business models for digital preservation and custody
175th Anniversary of Photography

Deadline for proposals: 28th February 2014
Acceptance of proposals: 30th April 2014
Deadline for texts submission (web): 1st September 2014

Further information about how to register and give your presentation is available on the official Annual Conference 2014 website: http://www.girona.cat/web/ica2014/eng/comunicacions.php

Read Full Post »

Call for contributions: Special Issue of ‘Archives and Records’ on visual arts archives

 

Recent years have seen a rise in the profile of the visual arts archive.  From a specialist sector, the field has become a site of rich convergence for many current issues affecting archives, such as interdisciplinary encounters with notions of the archive, and the archive as a site of creative practice.   Contributions are invited to a special issue of Archives and Records (formerly the Journal of the Society of Archivists) on the theme of the visual arts archive.   Articles might consider aspects of this field of archival practice, or engage with discussions about visual arts archives that have taken place outside the archival profession.  The issue particularly seeks to foster interdisciplinary debate, so contributions are encouraged from within and outside the archival profession, especially where they engage with aspects of archival practice.

Over the past decade, many academic journals have produced special issues on the Archive.  This special issue seeks to reach in the opposite direction, outwards from the archive to the field of visual culture.  The visual arts sector has seen particularly rich interdisciplinary exchanges and discourses about archives.  Increasingly, archivists have entered these critical and philosophical debates and enriched the dialogue using archivaltheory and practice, which has often been under-represented.  Meanwhile, the role of the archivist, like that of the curator, has experienced a dissolving of its boundaries, its field of practice explored by those from a range of perspectives interested in the stewardship of visual arts archives, in both digital and analogue forms.

In particular, 2013 has seen a number of events that indicate the pertinence of this field of enquiry for a special issue of Archives and Records, with several conferences and symposia organized both within and outside the archival profession.  A book, All that Stuff: Archiving the Artist, has been published by the ARLIS Committee for Art + Design Archives, the culmination of a strand of innovative interdisciplinary work which started with events at Tate Britain in 2007 and 2009.  Meanwhile, The National Archives’ strategic initiative ‘Archiving the Arts’ has launched, aiming “to ensure that the records of art in the UK are well cared for and accessible, and that their value is recognized”.

We invite papers reflecting on any aspect of archival practice in visual arts archives.  Contributions might consider, but are not confined to, the following themes:

•          Interdisciplinary perspectives on visual arts archives

•          Building relationships with art and design practitioners and organisations

•          Alternative archival practices of visual arts archives

•          Defining the archival object in the visual arts environment: non-traditional archival forms

•          New technologies in visual arts records, their collection, management and preservation

•          Copyright and intellectual property rights in art and design environments

•          Value in visual arts archives, which might include monetary and reputational values

•          Hidden or under-researched visual arts materials

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Editor of this special issue, Sue Breakell (s.m.breakell@brighton.ac.uk) to discuss potential articles.  The deadline for submissions is 31st July 2014.   All submissions will be double blind peer-reviewed and should be presented in line with Archives and Records style guidelines, available at http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cjsa20&page=instructions#.Un9ccCefauI

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »