Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Bookings open for ARA 2014 Conference

Bookings are open for the 2014 Archives and Records Association Conference, which takes place in Newcastle from 27 to 29 August. The theme is: ‘Survival of the fittest: strengths, skills and priorities for 2014 and beyond’.

You can see the latest programme – keep in touch as more is added all the time –  and book online at  www.archives.org.uk

The conference has its popular ‘Archives and Records’ and ‘Conservation’ streams throughout the three days.

An early bird booking discount is available until 21 April.

Caroline Brown, Chair of the Conference Committee says: ‘We’re delighted to announce that Rick Prelinger will be a keynote speaker at the conference. Rick is an archivist, writer and filmmaker, founder of the Prelinger Archives and an Internet Archive board member. Rick’s interests are in personal and institutional record keeping, access to the cultural record, media and social change, digital and participatory archives and cinema and public history.

‘The following quotations demonstrate how much Rick has to say on the theme of our conference that is of relevance to archivists, records managers and conservators.

•       ‘Access means making it as simple and inexpensive for anyone, anywhere, anytime to access copies of works … I think we should define access expansively and generously ’
•       ‘I think we’re not being Utopian enough, we are reactive. We react to things that people do in other fields’
•       ‘I don’t see us coming to terms with technology. This is not a critical statement, it is a wake-up call’
•       ‘I realize I am stating the obvious but I’m not sure that everybody in the world realises that wonderful and unpredictable things happen when ordinary people are given access to primary materials’

‘Rick’s understanding of the importance of what we do and his belief in the need for us to be forward thinking and creative in our responses to change suggests his keynote will be provocative, thought provoking and inspiring.’

The ARA  will announce details of bursaries for the conference shortly.

 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Religious Archives Group Conference 2014: Religious Archives and Universities

Booking is now open for the 2014 RAG conference to be held on 8 May 2014 at Pusey House in Oxford. A full programme may be found on the RAG website here:

 

 

 

and also as an attachment to this email. I’d be grateful if anyone with an appropriate noticeboard could print it out and put it up.

 

A booking form is attached and also available using the link above. These must be returned by Friday 18 April 2014 and no refunds will be given after this date.

 

  • “Some of the most important historical documents charting the history of central Europe in the 20th century are feared lost, after a fire at the state archives of Bosnia-Herzegovina in Sarajevo.

    The archive, which contains mostly documents from 1878 to 1918, when the Austro-Hungarian ministry of finance was in charge of Bosnia, but also older material from the Ottoman period and documents from the war crimes commission after the second world war, was targeted by protesters on Friday.”

    tags: archives news

  • “Some of the most important historical documents charting the history of central Europe in the 20th century are feared lost, after a fire at the state archives of Bosnia-Herzegovina in Sarajevo.

    The archive, which contains mostly documents from 1878 to 1918, when the Austro-Hungarian ministry of finance was in charge of Bosnia, but also older material from the Ottoman period and documents from the war crimes commission after the second World War, was targeted by protesters on Friday.”

    tags: archives

  • “WASHINGTON — Some lawmakers are trying to prevent the return to Baghdad of a cache of Iraqi Jewish community records, which were seized by the U.S. military during the Iraq war and occupation.

    The Senate on Thursday unanimously backed a bipartisan resolution introduced by Sen. Patrick Toomey (R–Pa.) that urged the State Department to reconsider returning the artifacts to Iraq.”

    tags: archives

  • “A number of documents belonging to the Ottoman era were seriously damaged in a fire in the presidential office in Sarajevo.

    A series of protests in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina turned into nationwide violence over the weekend. Protesters across Bosnia set fire to many government buildings including presidential building.

    The archives executive, Saban Zahırovic, said that many historical documents, rulings, and microfilms had been damaged. Zahirovic described the incident as a crime against the country’s culture and history. “

    tags: archives

  • “At the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, 24 items from the Iraqi Jewish Archive have just gone on display. I attended the February 3 opening of the exhibit, entitled “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” It included a 16th century Hebrew Bible, a hand-lettered Passover Haggadah from 1902, and a 1967 school transcript for an Iraqi Jewish boy. These items weren’t just beautiful to behold. They were also deeply political.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Archival Science

 

 

Call for Papers

Special Issue on ‘Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving’

 

 

Guest Editors:

 

Ben Alexander, Queens College, City University of New York

 

Andrew Flinn, University College London, University of London

 

 

Although archiving the records of political activism, particularly grassroots activism, is not a new practice, it has often been a controversial and contested process resulting in informal and autonomous activist archival endeavours as well as collections in more orthodox higher education and other local and national specialist archival repositories. In recent years the collection, preservation and the promotion of the use of activist collections for historical research and for ‘social justice’ or ‘human rights’ struggles has become increasingly prevalent in the formal archival sector as well as amongst the growing numbers of independent and autonomous archival endeavours. This explicit alignment with political activism and social justice objectives is not without its critics within the recordkeeping profession, but the archiving of activism and an activist archival approach goes beyond notions of the ‘active archivist’ and instead embraces an understanding of archival practice as (by its very nature) a form of social, cultural, and political activism. Although not necessarily synonymous, these developments come at a time when notions of a more active, collaborative and participatory archival practice are gaining currency in the professional archival world, sharing perhaps an understanding of the power of the democratisation of the production and creation of knowledge.

 

 

Accordingly, this special issue of Archival Science “Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving” will explore the varied connections between contemporary archival practice and activism in many different contexts (national, political, socio-economic, technological, autonomous and formal). This special issue will be guest edited by Ben Alexander, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at Queens College, The City University of New York benjamin.alexander@qc.cuny.edu and Andrew Flinn, Department of Information Studies, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University College London, a.flinn@ucl.ac.uk. Questions about the special issue can be direct to Drs. Alexander and Flinn.

 

 

Suggested topics for papers may include:

 

 how do mainstream archives and archivists work to preserve activist struggles of the past (such as the civil rights movement in the American South, struggles for equality and against discrimination, radical political movements of the left and right as well as across divided and antagonistic communities);

 

 how the constitution of archives and the active ‘use’ of the past history is considered by archival activists to be a core component of their political activities;

 

 how global moves to ensure preservation and use of the documentation of social and political atrocities (including genocide, human rights abuses and repressive regimes) in Truth and Reconciliation, criminal tribunals and other social justice processes has increasingly

 

 involved archivists as key active participants in on-going struggles for Human Rights and

 

Justice.

 

 the impact of technology in promoting the collection, sharing and use of activist histories and for promoting a sense of a more collaborative and participatory approach to the production of ‘useful’ knowledge

 

 the implications of a social justice or human rights orientation to archival practice for the traditional professional adherence to political neutrality

 

 

Key Dates

 

Submission Deadline for completed papers: May 16, 2014

 

Submission instructions

 

Papers submitted to this special issue for possible publication must be original and must not be under consideration for publication in any other journal or conference. Previously published or accepted conference/workshop papers must contain at least 30% new material to be considered for the special issue (for workshops 50% new content is required). Submissions should be made online via the Editorial Manager System at http://www.editorialmanager.com/arcs/.

 

During submission please select article type “SI: Archiving Activism”. All manuscripts must be prepared according to the journal publication guidelines which can also be found on the website http://www.springer.com/10502. Papers will be reviewed following the journal standard peer review process (double-blind).

 

ICA Annual Conference 2014, Girona, Spain, 13-15 October 2014: Call for presentations


The ICA 2014 Annual Conference Joint Programme Committee is seeking presentations from speakers who can lead ICA members and stakeholders in debates on the following themes:
Cultural and creative industries, and strategies of collaboration with archives
Actions and initiatives
Archives and web portals
Access to information
Digital repositories and authenticity preservation in the Cloud
Open data projects
Business models for digital preservation and custody
175th Anniversary of Photography

Deadline for proposals: 28th February 2014
Acceptance of proposals: 30th April 2014
Deadline for texts submission (web): 1st September 2014

Further information about how to register and give your presentation is available on the official Annual Conference 2014 website: http://www.girona.cat/web/ica2014/eng/comunicacions.php

Originally posted on Facet Publishing:

This presentation takes you chapter-by-chapter through Caroline Brown’s new edited collection, Archives and Recordkeeping: Theory into Practice.

View original

We thought you might like to know that PrestoCentre has published new training material for archives called: “Preservation Case Studies for Archives”. The Case Studies have been written by Jim Lindner and Mick Newnham.

Preservation Case Studies for Archives is a new, innovative educational experience. It places the archival student in the role of the decision maker, where one has to balance both resources and constraints. Through a dynamic process of idea exchange, students first learn about the situation, then identify and analyse the problems to determine the causes, and finally develop alternative strategies for a solution.

For more information see www.prestocentre.org/casestudies


PrestoCentre Foundation

PO Box 1060
1200 BB Hilversum
The Netherlands

Tel. +31 20 894 3570 / +1 347 404 5337
Skype: PrestoCentre
Website: http://www.prestocentre.org

A reminder that the deadline for submission is 30th December 2013. One of the speakers commented on last year’s conference ‘I had a wonderful time throughout, the presentations were all thought-provoking, and it was a pleasure to present and receive feedback from such an engaged audience’. That could be you in Newcastle!

 


Archives and Records Association Annual Conference 

 

NEWCASTLE, United Kingdom

 

27th – 29th August 2014

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Deadline for submission 30th December 2013

 

 

‘Survival of the Fittest: strengths, skills and priorities for 2014 and beyond’

 

This century has seen rapid changes in how we create, use, disseminate and access information. Increased interactions between states, organisations and societies have raised questions about the creation, recording and control of information.  Individuals and communities are remembering and communicating in different ways and records and archives are being used in new and increasingly creative environments. Archivists, records managers and conservators are uniquely placed to react to these developments and to use their strengths to manage and preserve the records and archives of today and the future. However, are these strengths fit for purpose? Do we need to learn new skills or to change our priorities? How can we survive and thrive?  Is there a role for us as professionals in the future?

 

 

 

The Archives and Records Association UK & Ireland invites proposals for papers, presentations and workshops on these themes for its annual conference to be help in Newcastle, August, 2014.

 

 

 

The conference will have two streams (archives and records management / conservation). We welcome suggestions for papers, panels, case studies, debates and workshops on the following areas.  There may also be opportunities for poster presentations, proposals for these should be submitted as below.

 

 

·         What are the core skills of the profession? How have they changed?

 

·         What new skills do we need and how can we acquire them?

 

·         With so many different skills will the future see specialists rather than generalists?

 

·         How do we articulate our value and impact?

 

·         How do we make the most of changes in organisations and technology?

 

·         What impact do new ways of creating and using records have?

 

·         How do we manage digital records and archives?

 

·         Is the profession just about managing risk? Or promoting well-being?

 

·         Is there a difference between records managers, archivists and information professionals?

 

·         How important are shared services and partnerships?

 

·         How can we be creative about what we do?

 

·         How do we prioritise for posterity?

 

·         What is the role of research and theory?

 

 

The programme is flexible and session lengths will be decided once papers have been chosen but please note that individual speakers will generally have no longer than 30 minutes for their presentations.

 

 

Submitting your proposal:

 

 

 

Please submit your proposal, in the format suggested below, to:

 

 

 

Caroline Brown (Archives and Records Management stream)

 

Chair, ARA Conference 2014

 

c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

 

01382 388773

 

 

 

Mark Allen (Conservation stream)

 

mark_allen@flintshire.gov.uk

 

01244 532 364

 

 

 

The deadline for submission of proposals is:  30th December 2013.

 

Submissions will be considered by the Programme Sub-committee in December, and invitations to speak will be confirmed by the Committee by February 2014. Speakers will be reimbursed travel expenses and will receive free conference registration for the day on which they are speaking. International speakers will be reimbursed travel expenses within the UK only.

 

 

●            Try to connect your proposal to the theme of the conference as best you can. The theme is designed for speakers to bring topics to light that touch on contemporary issues

 

●            Try to be creative with your paper! How will your paper stimulate debate?

 

●            Please provide as full information as you can about your proposal – this helps the Committee in making choices about papers and scheduling of sessions

 

●            Try to be relevant and representative: consider looking at a topic from opposing viewpoints, or focus on the broader picture rather than institutionally specific ones

 

●             If you are considering making a group submission for a session, try to mix speakers from different backgrounds and institutions, or try to include a user or customer perspective

 

 

 

Your proposal should include the following:

 

 

 

-                      Name of proposer (or lead contact for group proposals)

 

-                      Institution

 

-                      Contact details

 

Address

 

Telephone

 

Email

 

Fax

 

-                      Submission title (or working title)

 

-                      Speakers (if a panel session)

 

-                      Session description (brief description, max 250 words)

 

-                      Brief biography/ies of speakers

 

-                      Special equipment needed (AV equipment etc)

 

-                      Any other information

 

 

 

 

 

For further information, or if you have any further questions, please

 

contact:

 

 

 

Caroline Brown

 

Chair, ARA Conference 2014

e-mail:  c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

 

Royal Voluntary Service is pleased to announce that it has updated its online catalogue, extending the index of our WVS Narrative Reports (inscribed on the UNESCO UK memory of the World register) up to the year 1955.

This represents, 5,851 new entries which cover c.25,000 individual reports from around the UK.

The catalogue, launched in January this year, already contained entries for 5,000 images (including over 1,000 preview images) and 80,000 of our Narrative reports from 1938-1945.

This is part of a two year £52K cataloguing project funded by Royal Voluntary Service (due to reach completion in March 2014) which hopes to catalogue and repackage all of our reports up to 1965. It is part of our ongoing development programme to grant greater access to our nationally and internationally important collection.

You can access the catalogue via our website, by visiting www.royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk/our-history and clicking on the catalogue link in the menu.

You can obtain copies of any of our Narrative Reports by making an enquiry through our free enquiry service, details of which you can find in the ‘our History’ section of our website.

 

I am very pleased to announce the launch of a new ICA-sponsored multilingual database of archival terminology. The product of several years’ hard work by many people, this resource aims to serve as a dynamic, collaborative, cross-referential dictionary and index of archival concepts and terminology as expressed through different languages, cultures, and ways of thinking about records.

Never again will you have to ask yourself “how do you say ‘fonds’ in English?” – which is, of course, a trick question.

Read more here:

http://icarchives.webbler.co.uk/14282/ica-multilingual-archival-terminology/ica-multilingual-archival-terminology.html

We are delighted to announce the launch of the online catalogue of the British Red Cross Museum and Archives. The collection provides a fascinating insight into our humanitarian work from our beginnings in 1870 as the British National Society for Aid to the Sick and Wounded in War, to our continuing vital contribution in today’s society. 

 

 

New catalogue entries will be added at regular intervals but please could you let your readers know that this resource is now available.

 

For access to the catalogue or for more general information about the Museum and Archives including our research services, historical factsheets and online exhibitions please visit the following site:

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/Museum-and-archives

 

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar 2014: The Global Archive

When: Friday, 28 February 2014

 

Where: The Chancellors Hall, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London

 

Hosted by The Royal Historical Society, the Institute of Historical Research, The National Archives and the University of Leicester

 

Attendance is free but numbers will be limited; please reply to research@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk to reserve a place. The full programme will be available shortly.

 

In recent years, there has been a turn to the global across the humanities and social sciences, including in the discipline of History.  Global history has been taken to mean many things, and can encompass world, transnational, postcolonial and connected and comparative approaches to the study of the past. But what are the implications of this widening of research beyond traditional national or area studies frameworks for archives? How does it impact on the way in which archivists view their collections, and how historians use them? How best can UK archives support global history? And how do their collections relate to the need for multi-sited research that doing global history implies? Does global history imply an expansion of the historian’s traditional archive, and the incorporation of other traces of the past, such as through oral history or ethnographies of commemoration? And, how does the global turn cause us to look differently at, and generate new uses for, the collections in UK archives? These are some of the questions that we will explore in this year’s Gerald Aylmer Seminar.

 

Call for contributions: Special Issue of ‘Archives and Records’ on visual arts archives

 

Recent years have seen a rise in the profile of the visual arts archive.  From a specialist sector, the field has become a site of rich convergence for many current issues affecting archives, such as interdisciplinary encounters with notions of the archive, and the archive as a site of creative practice.   Contributions are invited to a special issue of Archives and Records (formerly the Journal of the Society of Archivists) on the theme of the visual arts archive.   Articles might consider aspects of this field of archival practice, or engage with discussions about visual arts archives that have taken place outside the archival profession.  The issue particularly seeks to foster interdisciplinary debate, so contributions are encouraged from within and outside the archival profession, especially where they engage with aspects of archival practice.

Over the past decade, many academic journals have produced special issues on the Archive.  This special issue seeks to reach in the opposite direction, outwards from the archive to the field of visual culture.  The visual arts sector has seen particularly rich interdisciplinary exchanges and discourses about archives.  Increasingly, archivists have entered these critical and philosophical debates and enriched the dialogue using archivaltheory and practice, which has often been under-represented.  Meanwhile, the role of the archivist, like that of the curator, has experienced a dissolving of its boundaries, its field of practice explored by those from a range of perspectives interested in the stewardship of visual arts archives, in both digital and analogue forms.

In particular, 2013 has seen a number of events that indicate the pertinence of this field of enquiry for a special issue of Archives and Records, with several conferences and symposia organized both within and outside the archival profession.  A book, All that Stuff: Archiving the Artist, has been published by the ARLIS Committee for Art + Design Archives, the culmination of a strand of innovative interdisciplinary work which started with events at Tate Britain in 2007 and 2009.  Meanwhile, The National Archives’ strategic initiative ‘Archiving the Arts’ has launched, aiming “to ensure that the records of art in the UK are well cared for and accessible, and that their value is recognized”.

We invite papers reflecting on any aspect of archival practice in visual arts archives.  Contributions might consider, but are not confined to, the following themes:

•          Interdisciplinary perspectives on visual arts archives

•          Building relationships with art and design practitioners and organisations

•          Alternative archival practices of visual arts archives

•          Defining the archival object in the visual arts environment: non-traditional archival forms

•          New technologies in visual arts records, their collection, management and preservation

•          Copyright and intellectual property rights in art and design environments

•          Value in visual arts archives, which might include monetary and reputational values

•          Hidden or under-researched visual arts materials

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Editor of this special issue, Sue Breakell (s.m.breakell@brighton.ac.uk) to discuss potential articles.  The deadline for submissions is 31st July 2014.   All submissions will be double blind peer-reviewed and should be presented in line with Archives and Records style guidelines, available at http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cjsa20&page=instructions#.Un9ccCefauI

Voices and the Archive: Oral History Research and Researchers

20 November 2013, London

The trend to re-use qualitative data in the social sciences is now well-established though the use of oral history archives is less widespread. As part of the NOVELLA (Narratives of Varied Everyday Life and Linked Approaches) programme, based at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, we have been using different narrative archival sources, such as diaries and oral history, to study the habitual, everyday food practices of families in hard times.

This one day seminar about using oral history data forms part of the Novella project. Through a series of presentations and audience-led discussion the seminar will examine the issues raised by the creation and use of oral history archives in social science research, from the perspectives of academics, archivists and community oral historians. Questions to be addressed include: who are the creators and users of oral history? How is oral history used by social scientists, historians, archivists and community oral historians? What makes oral history sources different from other qualitative data and what challenges does the creation and use of oral history raise? Speakers include Paul Thompson, Joanna Bornat, Graham Smith, and Jane Renouf and will be chaired by Lord Clark of Windermere. The event will be of relevance to researchers and archivists interested in creating and using oral history archives for social scientific research.

‘Voices and the Archive’ (10.30 am 4.30 pm) will be held in Central London, with registration from 10 am. The cost of attendance includes refreshments on arrival, lunch and afternoon tea. Places are limited and offered on a first come first served basis.

‘Voices and the Archive’ is hosted by NOVELLA (Narratives of Varied Everyday Lives and Linked Approaches) in collaboration with the UK Data Service. NOVELLA is an ESRC funded, National Centre for Research Methods Phase III node concerned with the everyday habitual practices of families.

To book a place on this event please visit our online store.

 

Originally posted on Refugee Archives and History Group:

For Refugee Week UK 2013 (17th-23rd June 2013) we looked at the contributions of refugees to our history and heritage. We decided to create a time-line and ‘living archive’ which acknowledges these contributions.

The time-line is at its early stages and we hope that, with your involvement, it will grow, develop and celebrate all our similarities and difference. It is a participatory ‘living archive’, which means that with your perspectives and input it will keep changing and improving, ensuring that we acknowledge and record our full and diverse history and heritage. We also hope that you will find it useful and as fascinating as we do!

Image

Did you know, for example, that the UK has been offering protection to refugees for hundreds of years? That refugees and their descendants have had significant contributions to our arts, science, sports and literature? That refugees co-designed Hampton Court Palace, helped establish the Bank…

View original 103 more words

Re-blog from the Guardian Online - The cost of historical research: why archives need to move with the times

The cost of historical research: why archives need to move with the times

The variable fees charged to access original documents risk putting archival research out of general reach, says Nell Darby.

Should researchers be charged additional fees to take photographs of archived material? Photograph: Uriel Sinai/Getty Images

As county archives face continued financial pressure on their services, history researchers are facing increasing difficulty in accessing original archival documents. Reduced and often complex opening arrangements, fewer staff and closures over lunch periods makes pre-planning an inevitable part of the archival research process.

Archives appear to be using fees to plug gaps in their finances – and these can often be idiosyncratic. Day passes are issued for users to photograph documents to transcribe later from home or university. These can vary in price from £2 at Birmingham to £25 at North Yorkshire County Record OfficeBerkshire Record Office charges £1 per image and for those needing access to long documents, the cost can become prohibitive. This includes me. I am researching 18th-century magistrates’ notebooks, which can run to hundreds of pages of dense text.

These fees matter. Archivists are not the only ones under financial pressure – researchers are too. Research students have limited budgets and are increasingly time-strapped. Transcribing documents in record offices is time consuming and taking photographs to access documents in our own time is invaluable. It means less time spent using record office resources, yet we are being charged inconsistent amounts to use our own cameras.

The costs and difficulties in accessing archival documents is having an impact on history researchers who may feel that it is too hard to access these documents, and instead rely on more limited sources or digitised resources. In doing so, they miss out on a wealth of information and the quality of research suffers.

I raised this subject on Twitter where it received a significant response among professional researchers, academics and students. My own supervisor at the University of Northampton, Drew Gray, criticised the charges at Berkshire Record Office, pointing out that “even the British Library’s copying service is better value”.

Gray added: “There should be a standard charge and it should be fair and reflect costs, otherwise it penalises researchers without considerable funding behind them, which is elitist.” This was also a point raised by Cathryn Pearce of Greenwich Maritime Institute, who argued that it was “very elitist to only allow the rich or funded to take photos for research. Many of us doing good work … can’t afford that”.

Louise Falcini, an 18th-century historian based at the University of Reading, pointed out that the National Archives allows all researchers to photograph documents for free. She said: “I took almost 500 photographs at the National Archives – all for research purposes. £500 wouldn’t have been an option.”

Lucy Bailey, another PhD student at the University of Northampton, had hoped to photograph a Victorian shop account book on her visit to Berkshire Record Office, in order to transcribe it in her own time from home. Surprised at the £1 per image cost, Bailey queried the reasoning behind it with a county archivist who responded: “We charge a unit rate rather than a daily rate simply because we believe that it better reflects what a user is acquiring. It seems to us analogous to making printouts from microfilm or from a digitised image and to the supply of photocopies, where the charge is directly related to the number of copies supplied.”

What Berkshire’s price structure fails to recognises that a researcher photographing documents costs the archive less than if they requested copies or spent days sitting in the archive transcribing material. Using your own camera and asking an archivist to photocopy documents are simply not analogous.

A survey conducted by Lucy Bailey looking at self-service photography costs levied by county archives across England, showed a striking lack of consistency. Hampshire Archives charge £12.50 for a daily camera pass, and East Sussex £15, second only to North Yorkshire’s £25. Conversely,Herefordshire ArchivesDevon Heritage Centre and North Devon Record Office charge only £3 per day. Yet some other regional archives, including Northumberland and North East Lincolnshire, continue to let researchers photograph documents for free.

Archivists argue that photograph fees should be seen as separate to research fees – one pointed out on Twitter that “research is still free even when photography is not”. Luci Gosling, historical specialist for theMary Evans Picture Library, says researchers should bear in mind that many archive charges are funnelled back into maintaining or improving the resources or facilities of the archive itself.

It is the age of the digital historian. Technology gives researchers the means of carrying out their work more effectively and quickly, and archivists need to respond positively to these changes. Without encouraging researchers to use and disseminate their material, archive buildings risk becoming populated only by those with the incomes to be able to indulge in research – and we will all be poorer for it.

Nell Darby is a doctoral research student in history at the University of Northampton – follow her on Twitter @nelldarby

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To get more articles like this direct to your inbox, become a member ofthe Higher Education Network.

 

Originally posted on UKHRG - UK Heritage Research Group:

Envisioning the library of the future
Arts Council England, May 2013

Envisioning the library of the future, a major research project undertaken over the past year, has been published. The research will help library staff, funders and users to better understand what libraries could and should look like in the future.
Valued services: The research has found that public libraries are trusted spaces, open to all, in which people continue to explore and share the joys of reading, information, knowledge and culture. People will continue to value the services that libraries provide in the future.

Challenges ahead: Envisioning the library of the future also indicates public libraries face many challenges in the coming years, including: advances in technology, which affect the ways in which people want to connect to information and culture; reduced public expenditure; the increasing involvement of citizens in the design and delivery of public services; and the needs of…

View original 4 more words

Members of the East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) yesterday passed a motion condemning the UN system for failing “to prevent the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi despite having received reports to that effect.”

The motion, moved by MP Abubakar Zein Abubakar [Kenya], also declared the Assembly’s support for “the decision of the Council of Ministers to ensure that all the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR ) be transferred to Rwanda.”

While addressing the lawmakers on Tuesday, President Paul Kagame, called for deepening of regional integration across Africa to boost the continent’s ability to stand for its rights.

Yesterday’s sitting was the actual plenary business for the fifth meeting of the first session of the third Assembly that runs from Tuesday until April 26 in Kigali.

The motion was seconded by MP Abubakar Ogle [Kenya], before it got the House’s unanimous approval.

Apart from expressing profound disappointment with the failure of the UN to prevent the Genocide, EALA declared “its solidarity with the people and Government of Rwanda especially now when they are commemorating the 1994 Genocide.

The Assembly appreciates the resilience of the people and Government of the Republic of Rwanda in copying with the legacy of Genocide on their own for the last 19 years, the legislators said in a statement.

The resolution demands the Council of Ministers to designate April 7 of every year as the EAC Day of Reflection on the Genocide against the Tutsi.

It calls on EAC Partner States to commemorate the Genocide; and act in accordance with the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of genocide by putting in place necessary mechanisms to track and bring Genocide fugitives to justice.

In addition, it calls on the EAC to enact laws punishing and negating the crime of genocide denial and propagating hate speeches embodying genocide ideology.

The resolution calls upon the EAC Summit (of Heads of State) to urge the UN to adopt a Resolution establishing an International Trust Fund for Survivors of the Genocide against the Tutsi and that the EAC do organise a Regional Conference to address the issues of Genocide as part of the 20th commemoration of the Genocide, next year.

via allAfrica.com: Rwanda: EALA Backs Rwanda’s Quest for ICTR Archives (Page 1 of 2).

via allAfrica.com: Rwanda: EALA Backs Rwanda’s Quest for ICTR Archives (Page 1 of 2).

On Wednesday East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) parliamentarians passed a motion declaring their institution’s support for the decision of the Council of Ministers to ensure that all the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) be transferred to Rwanda.

It is extremely unfortunate and frustrating that Rwandans are still being forced to agitate for this essential part of our own history. Make no mistake; those archives are our history.

They document the planning, execution and aftermath of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. They reveal the legal process in which the architects of the more than a million deaths faced justice.

They document the crimes that monsters like genocidal regime Prime Minister Jean Kambanda, Jean Paul Akayesu and the virulent Theoneste Bagosora committed.

It is simply mind-boggling that the archives would find another home. Where else would they be as valued? Where else would they provide such a lesson to the citizenry?

Placing the archives in any other hands would be a slap in the face of all Rwandans. The EALA realises this and so does the East African Community. The United Nations system must not betray Rwandans the way it did 19 years ago.

via allAfrica.com: East Africa: The ICTR Archives Belong to Rwandans.

via allAfrica.com: East Africa: The ICTR Archives Belong to Rwandans.

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

News release from The National Archives:

We are working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) to transfer and begin releasing colonial administration records, referred to as the ‘migrated archives’ between April 2012 and November 2013. This is in accordance with FCO’s published timeline on GOV.UK

The fifth tranche will be made available in the reading rooms at The National Archives from Friday 26 April 2013. The collection forms record series FCO 141: Foreign and Commonwealth Office and predecessors: Records of Former Colonial Administrations: Migrated Archives.

What the records contain

This release will contain records from Ceylon, Kenya, Malta, Mauritius, New Hebrides, Nigeria, Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, Palestine, Sierra Leone and Singapore.

The records cover a wide range of subject matter relating to colonial administration. The material reflects events in the territories generally pre-independence and the views of Her Majesty’s Government at that time.

Using the records

A guide to…

View original 57 more words

The following title has recently been published by Facet:

 

Preserving Archives, 2nd edition

Helen Forde and Jonathan Rhys-Lewis

 

This is a brand new and fully updated edition of this seminal work on archival preservation.

Archivists in all types of organizations face questions on how to plan a preservation strategy in less than perfect circumstances, or deal with a sudden emergency. This book considers the causes of threats to the basic material, outlines the preservation options available and offers flexible solutions applicable in a variety of situations.  It offers a wide range of case studies and examples from international specialists. This revised edition includes additional material on digital preservation and green building as well as a new chapter on the management and training of volunteers, reflecting a key concern for many archival institutions.

Table of contents (PDF): http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/forde-toc.pdf

Sample chapter (PDF): http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/forde-ch1.pdf

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=8231

 

Blog Posting originally published on the Voluntary Action and History Society (VAHS) Blog at:  http://www.vahs.org.uk/2013/04/the-campaign-goes-on/

The Campaign goes on

Posted on April 10, 2013 by Georgina Brewis

Readers of this blog may have noticed a recent rare good news story in the press about charity archives. After several years of protracted negotiation, the records of leading development organisation Oxfam are to be donated to the Bodleian Library in Oxford, thanks to a major cataloguing grant from the Wellcome Trust.

This is excellent news, and we hope there is more to come. Following a successful launch at the House of Lords in October 2012, the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives published its first draft guidance in March. The Keeping it Simple guide, aimed at small voluntary organisations, was put together by Co-ordinating Editor Philip Gale of The National Archives, with the input of voluntary organisations, historians and archivists. This is the first of what the Campaign intends as a series of documents offering practical advice to the creators and users of archives of the voluntary sector. Please do submit your comments on this guidance by 1 June 2013.

The ARA’s Archive Volunteering Award 2013 also presents a chance to recognise the contribution of volunteers to the charity archive sector. Last year the award was won by Wolverhampton City Archives, but leading charity archive WRVS received a special ‘highly commended’ award, designed to recognise the immense work of its volunteers in sorting, cataloguing and digitising its collection, enabling the re-opening of the enquiry service and launch of an online catalogue in January 2013. Perhaps a voluntary sector archive could win this year? Nominations close on 7 June 2013. In another coup for charity archives, the Planned Environment Therapy Trust Archive and Study Centre has been named Family History Magazine’s ‘Archive of the Year’.

Since its launch the Campaign has made contact with a number of interested parties in England, as well as in Canada, Australia and Northern Ireland who are similarly concerned with the plight of the records of charities, voluntary organisations and pressure groups. Meanwhile, working with members of the Campaign, the VAHS New Researchers Group is planning a workshop on using the archives and records of voluntary organisations later this year. Watch this space for more information.

Do you have a good news story about voluntary sector archives you’d like to share? Or a tale of a charity’s records under threat? The Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives is keen to involve a greater range of stakeholders, so do get in touch.

The British Records Association:

 

 ‘ARCHIVES AT RISK’: SEMINAR AT THE BRITISH LIBRARY, WEDNESDAY 8 MAY 2013, 2-4.45pm

 

The British Records Association is holding an afternoon seminar (1.30pm for 2pm) on its recently published report about risks currently threatening historical records and archives.  For details of the report please go to http://www.britishrecordsassociation.org.uk/pages/news.htm

 

The purpose of the seminar is to consider the issues raised by the report and the actions needed to tackle them.  The report highlighted generic risks and made a variety of proposals for further co-ordinated work to enhance the collection and preservation of both digital and traditional archive formats.  Short presentations will be given by Anthony Smith (British Records Association), Caroline Peach (British Library Preservation Advisory Centre), Melinda Haunton (The National Archives) and David Mander (Independent Consultant).

 

There will be plenty of opportunity for questions about the report as well as wider discussion on the feasibility of the proposals.  This event will be of interest to anyone who is concerned about current strategic and practical issues facing the proper preservation of the UK’s rich archival heritage and the variety of archive services that contribute to managing that heritage.

 

We would like the afternoon to provide the basis for an action plan and are very keen to make use of the occasion to hear from anyone who would be willing to address the issues raised by the report.

 

Attendance at the seminar is free and light refreshments will be provided on arrival, but places are limited.  Please book your place by contacting Maria Evans, British Records Association, Finsbury Library, 245 St John’s Street, London EC1V 4NB (info@britishrecordsassociation.org.uk; 0207 8330428) before Thursday 2 May 2013.

 

The Association welcomes constructive feedback and comment from readers of its report.  If you wish to comment on it, please contact the Chairman of the Association’s Records Preservation Section at rps@britishrecordsassociation.org.uk

 

Annual Conference

“Community as Archives, Archives as Community

ACA’s 38th Annual Conference – June 13-15, 2013 – Delta Winnipeg Hotel, Winnipeg, MB

Communities are the framework of our identities, our history and our lives. Online and offline, connected by geography, ethnicity, language, sexuality, interests, professions, friendship and kin, our lives are a lattice of communities.

Join us in Winnipeg, a city of communities and meeting places, for an exploration of how archival consciousness arises in communities and how community consciousness has arisen among archivists.

This year’s conference not only promises a thoroughly stimulating and engaging program, but also offers opportunities to join colleagues in experiencing Winnipeg’s irrepressible community spirit.  Social events will highlight a few of the unique eccentricities, charms, and attractions of Winnipeg and surrounding area.  Or you can explore what the city has to offer on your own!

ACA 2013 will allow you to be connected to the conference and your colleagues like never before, through Facebook, Twitter, and the ACA website.  And the ACA 2013 app will ensure that you have all the conference information you require no matter where you and your mobile device may be.

The ACA 2013 conference hotel is the Delta Winnipeg.  Among its many features are a central location in downtown Winnipeg within walking distance of many of the city’s attractions, a rooftop pool, excellent dining, a fantastic lounge, and strong Wi-Fi throughout the guest rooms and conference facilities.

The Call for Student Papers and a Call for Poster Submissions are now closed.

The preliminary 2013 Conference at a Glance is now available.  Conference information appears on the pages/screens in this section while additional information will be added as the sessions and social activities are developed and confirmed. See What’s New and Important Dates for more information.

Click this link for information about Past Conferences.  Proceedings from recent ACA Conferences are available in the Members’ Only area.

We look forward to you joining us in Winnipeg for ACA 2013!

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

From the Institute of Race Relations:

Why the voluntary sector is under threat

Written by Jenny Bourne

A report into the independence of the voluntary sector holds important lessons for groups struggling for funding and their very existence.

The voluntary sector is under threat. So, who cares, you might reply, everything is up for grabs these days. It is not enough to throw up ones hands and see the demise of the Third Sector as inevitable or unimportant or nothing to do with politics. To have a strong, independent voluntary sector is the lifeblood of struggles for justice. It is the sector which can campaign for change, can articulate the voices of the unheard and powerless, take on the ‘unpopular’ issues and challenge orthodoxies. But to do those things it has to be independent and truly distanced from both centres of power and private profit. And in both these areas…

View original 19 more words

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

Re-blogged from the Voluntary Action History Society:

The symbiotic relationship between the humanitarian sector and those who document its work is by no means an easy one. This point seems likely to be made again with Fatal Assistance, a documentary by Raoul Peck due to screen in London on Saturday as part of the Human Rights Watch film festival. It offers a critique of relief efforts in Haiti following the devastating earthquake of 2010.

For UK viewers, Peck’s film comes off the back of a feature-length piece – tellingly entitled The Trouble with Aid – screened by the BBC late last year. Made with the cooperation of key figures from the humanitarian sector, it portrayed fifty years of humanitarian aid as a story of manipulation and compromise. This clip discussing the camps for Rwandan refugees following the 1994 genocide gives a sense of the filmmakers’ approach:

Link…

View original 388 more words

I am writing to remind everyone about the workshop and lecture on 8 March 2013 by Professor Maria Tamboukou from the Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London.

If you would like more information about these events, please email novella@ioe.ac.uk.  If you would like to book onto either the workshop or lecture, please click on the web links below.

 

The thick autonomy of archival research (Workshop, 1-4pm)
Room G16, 9-11 Endsleigh Gardens In recent years archival research in the social sciences is emerging as a vibrant field of qualitative research, but despite a relatively small body of literature that has been slowly amassing around it (see Stanley 2011, Valles et al 2011), it still remains a relatively underdeveloped field outside the humanities. In this workshop we will look into questions of archival sensibility in social sciences research and explore a range of methodological approaches, epistemological standpoints and concerns, as well as theoretical questions and issues.

Drawing on Casey’s influential suggestion about the ‘thick autonomy of memory’ (2000) the archive is configured not just as a discursively constructed memory space, but also as a material assemblage, a laboratory of memory with specific spatio/temporal rhythms that significantly influence mnemonic practices in the study and writing of memory. The workshop will draw on specific case studies from archival research that Professor Maria Tamboukou has conducted in a number of archives in the UK and abroad over the last ten years, informed by neo-materialist approaches in feminist science studies. (see Tamboukou 2010)

http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=147&deptid=112&catid=42

 

Gendering the memory of work (Lecture, 5-7pm)
Drama Studio, Institute of Education

 

Over the past thirty years feminist theorists have drawn on women’s auto/biographical narratives to include them in the canonical texts of literary criticism, to rewrite social and cultural histories but also to understand and theorise the constitution of the gendered self in modernity. But if one looks into the rich body of scholarship around women’s auto/biographical narratives, there is very little theorisation on working women’s auto/biographies from a sociological perspective, although there is a substantial body of work in literary criticism (see Coiner 1995, Zandy1990). Even among the few notable exceptions (Hollis 2004, Stanley 1984, Swindells 1995) the seamstress seems to be a figure that has yet to be studied and analysed. It seems that working women in general and seamstresses in particular had very little time in their hands to write but did they really?

Professor Maria Tamboukou’s review of the literature has revealed a range of very interesting autobiographical documents that span diverse geographical, ethnic, racial and cultural backgrounds To be sure, seamstresses’ narratives or rather extracts of them have been widely used as illustrations and points of reference for many studies around women’s work in a wide range of disciplinary fields. However seamstresses’ narratives have never been analysed as ‘documents of life’ (Plummer 2001). It is this significant gap in the literature on women’s lives that Tamboukou’s research addresses, particularly focusing on the memory of work and its role in the constitution of female subjectivities. In this lecture Professor Tamboukou will present some of the emergent themes as well as a tentative framework for theorising gendered aspects in the memory of work.

http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=146&deptid=112&catid=42

 

Originally posted on UCA Archives:

Presenting the Tessa Boffin Archive at Brave New World

On the 16th February 2013 at the London Metropolitan archives LGBT conference, held at the stunning architectural and design surroundings of Guildhall, UCA Archives presented the Tessa Boffin archive, a Photographer specialising in LGBT issues including cross dressing,which looks at gender identity, and photographic responses to AIDS, alongside professional Photographer, Rebecca Andrews’, recen, around 2000, female body builder images. Andrews also looked at ways that gender identity can be portrayed (looking at Tessa Boffin’s 1980s archive and her own recent body builder work)

See Rebecca Andrews website http://www.rebecca-andrews.co.uk/

See Tessa Boffin Archive http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37974/Tessa-Boffin

Brave New World, Conference

Guildhall art Gallery also has an ongoing exhibition from acclaimed Photographer Ajamu, of under 35 LGBT black British born individuals, Fierce

http://ajamu-fineartphotography.co.uk/2012/01/27/fierce-2/

Themes of the day included Policy – Action and Impact, LGBT History and the Future, Community projects, and Culture and LGBT identity, from a range of passionate speakers

Brave New World Rebecca Andrews  16 February 2013

Brave New World Conference Rebekah Taylor, 16 February 2013

Brave New World Conference Guildhall venue 2, 16 February 2013

View original

Originally posted on Brunel Special Collections:

A guest post by Dr Claire Lynch.

As a researcher I’ve spent many happy hours, elbow deep in the manuscripts of the
Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiography held here at Brunel. The archive contains over 230 autobiographies by authors born between 1790 and 1945 and
was compiled by John Burnett, David Vincent, and David Mayall. They were
interested in how working class people had written about their own lives and the
texts they collected are rich and varied.

Burnett ArticleMy research looks at this material from a
literary perspective; I’m interested in the techniques these writers have used and the ways they have managed the almost impossible task of capturing life on the page.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been sharing this work with MA students from the English and Creative Writing programmes. For many of the students this is the first opportunity to work with manuscript material so…

View original 352 more words

Cartoon by Sally Wesley c.1770 showing parishioners attending church © John Rylands Library. Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester.

Cartoon by Sally Wesley c.1770 showing parishioners attending church © John Rylands Library. Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester.

A programme is now available below for our 2013 conference. The cost of the day is £45 including lunch and coffee.

Booking form is available here: RAG Booking Form 2013. Please complete and return this as soon as possible if you would like to attend and certainly by 10 April 2013

RAG Conference 2013: Localism in Religious Archives

London Metropolitan Archives, Friday 26 April 2013

10:20 Registration

10:40 Welcome

10:50 The Archives of the East London Mosque Jamil Sherif, Archivist, East London Mosque

11:25 Coffee

11:45 Using London’s Religious Collections: A Researcher’s Perspective Sarah Flew, The Open University

12:20 Archives of London’s Jewish Organisations Charles Tucker, Record Keeper, United Synagogue

13:00 Lunch

13:45 RAG AGM

14:30 Building Archive Facilities at Exeter Cathedral: Options, Appraisal, Decisions and Practicalities Ann Barwood, Canon Librarian and Ellie Jones, Archivist, Exeter Cathedral

15:15 The Cwm Jesuit Library Project Hannah Thomas, Swansea University

15:50 Wrap up

16:00 Close

 

From SCOLMA (UK Libraries & Archives Group on Africa) website:

March 4, 2013, 1-2pm, Senate House, 4th Floor

The challenge of the traditional collection and the possibilities of “Tribing and Untribing the Archive: the Material Record of the Thukela-Mzimkulu Region, c. 1750-1910″

A seminar by Nessa Liebhammer

BOOKING ESSENTIAL – contact daniel.gilfoyle@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk

Nessa Liebhammer discusses a collaborative project between the Archive and Public Culture Research Initiative at the University of Cape Town (APC) and the Johannesburg Art Gallery, which is the pilot of a larger project Ethnologised Pasts and their Archival Futures, launched by the APC.

Museum and art gallery displays, and colonial and apartheid knowledge activities, are one aspect with which the project is concerned. It aims to draw attention to the archival capacities and challenges of ethnographic material and to enable ongoing recuperation of pasts denied by colonialism and apartheid. The pilot takes as its focus the material culture of Thukela-Mzimkulu region, c 1750 – 1910. It calls into being an expanded archive for that period, and accounts for its historical disavowal.

Nessa Leibhammer is the curator of the Traditional Southern African Art at the Johannesburg Art Gallery, an Honorary Research Fellow of the University of Cape Town and currently a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for African Studies, Cambridge University.

 

ICA Annual Conference Brussels, 23-24 November 2013 “Accountability, Transparency and Access to Information”

It is time for the International Council on Archives to hold a high quality conference on records and information management issues.

Current trends such as the Open Government Partnership and the Open Data movement, combined with the on-going challenges and opportunities offered by modern technology mean that all areas of government and society, whether they know it or not, are considering recordkeeping issues. ICA’s first ever Annual Conference, “Accountability, Transparency and Access to Information” aims to tackle these issues from the bottom up and the top down, from practical solution-based case-studies, through international and collaborative case studies to high level government and international initiatives.

The programme themes include:

1. Citizens engaging with government, archives and history

2. Records providing evidence of rights

3. Legal issues

4. Role/contribution of archivists and records managers in/to accountability, transparency and access to information:

5. Initiatives:

6. Delivering access

7. Records Management
The 2013 Programme Committee is looking for relevant papers from good speakers who can provoke the ICA community and its wider stakeholders to reflect on and debate these very real challenges.

All information and submission documents can be found there:

http://icarchives.webbler.co.uk/?lid=13986&bid=1085

Contact the list owner for assistance at ARCHIVES-NRA-request@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

For information about joining, leaving and suspending mail (eg during a holiday) see the list website at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=archives-nra

 

Originally posted on UCA Archives:

BRAVE NEW WORLD

Sailor and the Showgirl Project (cross dressing and safe sex)

Sailor and the Showgirl Project (cross dressing and safe sex)


UCA Archives and UCA Photography graduate, Rebecca Andrews, will feature in the 10th Archives LGBT conference, held at Guildhall Library on the 16th February.

UCA Archives will showcase the Tessa Boffin Archive in a display. The archive is currently held at Maidstone campus.

Tessa Boffin was a lesbian photographer, writer, curator and performance artist. She studied photography in the 1980s at Polytechnic of Central London, and her work involved sex and sexual fantasy, where she explored issues such as transvestism, homosexuality and lesbianism. She was the first British lesbian doing political work around AIDS as early as the 1980s. She co-edited the 1990 Ecstatic Anti-bodies with Sunil Gupta, and edited Stolen Glances: Lesbians Take Photographs with Jean Fraser. Although her life was cut short at the age of 32, she built up an impressive body of work

Tessa Boffin’s archive…

View original 209 more words

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Tackling Human Trafficking in Europe: Prevention, Protection, Prosecution The Silken Berlaymont Hotel, Brussels, Wednesday 30th January 2013

Human trafficking is an increasingly disturbing phenomenon in Europe with terrible consequences for victims, the majority of whom are forced into prostitution, street crime, domestic servitude and other forms of labour exploitation.

The recently adopted EU Strategy towards the Eradication of Trafficking in Human Beings 2012-2016 sets out concrete and practical measures to be implemented over the next five years, placing victims at the forefront.

This special International Symposium will facilitate policy discussion and provide a timely opportunity to explore comprehensive and integrated solutions to fighting the ‘hidden’ crime of human trafficking.

For further details, please visit http://publicpolicyexchange.co.uk/events/DA30-PPE2.php . Do feel free to circulate this information to relevant colleagues within your organisation.

In the meantime, to ensure your organisation is represented, please book online at https://bookings.publicpolicyexchange.co.uk/bookings/book.php?event=DA30-PPE2 at your earliest convenience in order to secure your delegate place(s).

Kind regards,

Alexandra Kelly

Public Policy Exchange

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

 

E-mail: fmlist@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Posting guidelines: http://www.forcedmigration.org/research-resources/discussion/forced-migration-discussion-list-posting-guidelines

Subscribe/unsubscribe: http://tinyurl.com/fmlist-join-leave

List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

RSS: https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?RSS&L=forced-migration

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/refugeestudies

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Equalities in Education – the new landscape Principles, challenges and ways ahead

Date: 28th January 2013

Venue: Institute of Education, Jeffery Hall, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

Full details of programme, pricing and booking at at the conference website:

www.educationconference.org.uk
See also the publicity and booking form – [Available to Download Here]

 

Most schools throughout the UK are committed to reducing inequalities related to disability, ethnicity, faith, gender, sexual identity and social class. Their longstanding commitments have been supported and strengthened by the general and specific duties placed on all public authorities by the Equality Act 2010; the 2012 Ofsted framework; the targeted funding provided by the pupil premium grant, and the report of the Children’s Commissioner in England on school exclusions.

This conference will

• explore the implications of new legislation and funding for schools

• show how schools can illustrate the impact of intervention intended to raise attainment

• promote practical and strategic school leadership which is likely to be recognised as outstanding in a section 5 inspection (Framework for School Inspections: September 2012)

 

Who will benefit?

This conference is intended for senior leaders and teachers in all kinds of school, and for those who advise and support them. Participants are welcome from outside London as well as from within. The Equality Act 2010 charges schools with an expanded public sector equality duty. The focus has shifted from bureaucracy to outcomes in tackling unfairness and disadvantage. Schools are now required to publish equalities objectives and information which shows improved outcomes.

DfE statistics consistently show that the attainment levels of pupils from low-income backgrounds are well below national averages and are more likely than their peers to be persistently absent from school. Pupil Premium Grant funding has been provided to help schools close the attainment gap between these pupils and others. How have successful schools responded? Excellence in equalities is the hallmark of outstanding schools, colleges and local authorities throughout London. This conference will share excellent practice in closing the attainment gap.

Workshops will be led by experts and there will be opportunities for specialist networking. Practical case studies will be drawn from within the Greater London area. Participants will receive a resource pack designed to be useful reference material after the conference is over.

London Education Associates Foundation is a non-profit-making, non-political and faith-neutral organisation whose priorities and support for schools will withstand changes of central government. The object of LEA Foundation is to help schools break the link between poverty and low achievement. LEA Foundation offers a strategic framework for supporting school improvement throughout Greater London.

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Call for papers: British Library Preservation Advisory Centre Conference October 2013

 

Evolution or revolution? The changing face of collection care.

Are changes in the way content is created, acquired and used encouraging collection care departments to adapt their approach – or demanding it?

Venue: British Library, London

Date: 14-15 October 2013

 

The British Library Preservation Advisory Centre, in consultation with IFLA, is hosting a two day conference in October 2013 examining the nature and perception of the collection care department in the modern and increasingly digital environment. In particular, are the career paths of collection care practitioners sign-posted well enough to attract the right skills and offer the right opportunities to develop, lead and engage?

Collection care departments are operating in increasingly dynamic environments – not only in respect of resources, but also of technology, information, learning and publishing. Technology is constantly defining and re-defining trends in information and content – what is created and how; how it is acquired; and how it can be accessed and experienced.

For collection care departments, there are new technologies to understand, new risks and benefits to be weighed up, new approaches to be learned; and yet there remain vast, physical collections to be protected, preserved and cared for.

We invite you to join us to discuss the effect of such changes on collection care strategy and practice – now and in the future. What does an effective collection care department actually look like in an increasingly digital environment? What is its purpose, its responsibilities; its business model? Does this represent an evolution or a revolution in practice?

And what is the impact on the individual working in collection care? Do we have enough of the right skills in the right places? Are we managing the expectations of students coming into the profession adequately?

In this context has the role of the conservator changed? If not, does it need to?

What does the term ‘conservator’ actually mean?  Have we come to accept it as a term which identifies and defines an individual with a specific practical skill and nothing more; and is that enough? Or is the modern conservator equipped with other skills – as well as or instead of the traditional bench skills?

In addition to invited speakers, we are calling for papers in two areas. The first area explores high-level perspectives on future approaches to collection care; and the second examines the skills present in today’s collection care departments and how they have developed and are deployed

 

1. The collection care department of tomorrow Your paper should discuss, from a strategic point of view, the collection care department of tomorrow, considering any of the following issues:

 

•     the relationship between conservation, preservation and digital preservation

•     the balance between single-item conservation  and larger/mass treatments or projects

•     the skills that are needed

•     the research agenda

•     business models

•     demonstrating impact

•     public engagement

 

2. The collection care practitioners of today Do you currently work in collection care? In the context of an evolution or revolution in practice, your paper might discuss and explore your role, considering any of the following issues

 

•     What type of training did you undertake and in what format (may or may not be collection care or conservation specific)

•     Are you working in collection care disciplines now that are relevant to your training?

•     Have your responsibilities changed to cover other aspects of collection care?

•     Does your current job in collection care meet the expectations you had when you trained?

•     Does the work you do define/identify you specifically as a conservator; or do you view yourself as a collection care practitioner with a specific skill?

•     How relevant are your skills to collection care?

•     How do you see your role developing?

 

Important Information

1.    Abstracts must be 250-300 words in length

2.    Abstracts should be submitted as an email attachment to sandy.ryan@bl.uk

3.    Abstracts should contain

•     area of discussion (1 or 2)

•     full title

•     author information – name, position, institution and email contact

4.    The deadline for the submission of abstracts is February 28th 2013

5.    You will be notified by March 22nd 2013 if your submission has been successful or not

6.    If your submission is accepted, you will be directed at the time of notification  to full terms and conditions for presenting at the conference, but please note in the meantime that presentations are expected to last for approximately 20 minutes long and must be made freely available on the British Library website after the conference

7.    Conference registration will open in May 2013

 

Caroline Peach

Head of Preservation Advisory Centre

The British Library

96 Euston Road

London NW1 2DB

www.bl.uk/blpac

 

Contact the list owner for assistance at ARCHIVES-NRA-request@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

 

For information about joining, leaving and suspending mail (eg during a holiday) see the list website at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=archives-nra

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Dear colleagues:

The Section on University and Research Institution Archives (SUV) of the International Council on Archives will hold its 2013 conference from June 26-29 on the Caribbean island of Barbados. Hosted by the West Indies Federal Archives Centre of The University of the West Indies (UWI) at Cave Hill Campus, the conference will explore the theme of The New Age Archivist: Managing Records and Archives in a Digital World.

This Conference will provide a forum for archivists and other information professionals to investigate and discuss new trends in digitisation, electronic records and the Web. Speakers will assess the impact of the digital age on the appraisal, acquisition, storage, arrangement and description and the provision of access to the archives of universities and research institutions. Within this broad theme, archivists and information professionals will also examine the use of the “cloud,” social media and other online communities to create more meaningful interaction with users and potential users. It will also encourage debate on whether or to what extent archivists should seize the opportunity to use new modes of communication and outreach.

The Programme Committee for the 2013 SUV conference invites proposals for papers addressing the conference theme. The deadline for submitting proposals for individual papers or panel sessions is 15 January 2013 and proposers will receive a decision on the acceptance of their paper by 15 February 2013. Proposals should be submitted to the ICA SUV 2013 Conference Programme Committee Chair via e-mail at:  szary@email.unc.edu

The full call for proposals with full details is below. Please direct any questions about proposals to Richard Szary, chair of the Programme Committee, at szary@email.unc.edu

 

…………………………………………………………………

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Programme Committee of the ICA SUV is pleased to announce its Call for Papers for the 2013 Meeting which will be held in the Caribbean island of Barbados.

The West Indies Federal Archives Centre of The University of the West Indies (UWI) at Cave Hill Campus are honoured to host the 2013 meeting of the International Council on Archives – Section on University and Research Institution Archives (SUV). The planned duration of the Conference is four (4) days (inclusive of a one-day sightseeing heritage tour of the island, guided by Professor Karl Watson – Chair of the Barbados National Trust) from June 26th to 29th 2013.

THEME

The theme for the Conference is: The New Age Archivist: Managing Records and Archives in a Digital World.

 

This Conference will provide a forum for archivists and other information professionals to investigate and discuss new trends in digitisation, electronic records and the Web. Speakers will assess the impact of the digital age on the appraisal, acquisition, storage, arrangement and description and the provision of access to the archives of universities and research institutions. Within this broad theme, archivists and information professionals will also examine the use of the “cloud,” social media and other online communities to create more meaningful interaction with users and potential users. It will also encourage debate on whether or to what extent archivists should seize the opportunity to use new modes of communication and outreach.

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

·        Sir Hilary Beckles – Historian – Principal and Pro-Vice Chancellor – The UWI

·        Henry Fraser – Professor Emeritus – Past President of the Barbados National Trust

·        Luciana Duranti – Professor and Chair of Archives Studies – University of British Columbia, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies (Canada)

·        Ken Thibodeau – National Institute of Standards and Technology (U.S.)

 

Sub-themes that may be addressed are wide and open, but an advanced academic level of discourse is required. Proposals should be analytical, not descriptive, and should reflect the changing nature of the archival enterprise in a digital world. Inter alia, papers within the following sub-themes will be welcomed:

 

·        Challenges and Opportunities for Archives & Research Institutions in a Web Environment

·        The Role of Social Network Tools in promoting Archives and Research

·        Issues associated with Archives and Information Institutions adopting social Network tools

·        “Cloud” Storage – A Place for Archives and Research Institutions?

·        Current Usage of Web Applications in Universities and Research Institutions

·        The Web: “Breathing New Life” into University Archives and Research Institutions

·        Aligning Strategic Institutional Goals with a Web Presence

·        Coping with Reformatting Technologies in the Information World

·        Use of Emerging technologies in Information and Knowledge Management

 

Proposal Submission Guidelines

Panels of up to three speakers, or individual presentations, on the themes above are welcome. Submissions should include the speaker’s name(s), affiliation, postal address, e-mail address, telephone and fax numbers, a short one-paragraph biographical note, the title of the paper, and a synopsis of approximately 250- 300 words. If you are submitting a proposal for a complete panel session, please provide a description of 250-300 words for the session as a whole in addition to a synopsis for each presentation. Presentations should aim to last for a maximum of 20 minutes (sessions of three speakers should last for no more than 1.5 hours – three 20 minute papers plus discussion). Each synopsis will be reviewed by the Programme Review Committee and presenters of papers accepted will be notified by February 15th, 2013.

 

For a description of the process and the criteria which will be used to review proposals, see “Annual Conference Review Committee Guidelines” available at: www.library.illinois.edu/ica-suv/ReviewCommGuidelines.php

Should you have any questions, please contact:

Richard SZARY, Programme Committee Chair

Louis Round Wilson Library

CB #3908

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27514, United States

tel. 1 919 962-8125 – fax: 1 919 843-3480

e-mail: szary@email.unc.edu

 

Important Deadline Dates:

Abstracts submission: 15th January 2013

Notification of acceptance of abstracts: 15th February 2013

Abstracts should be submitted to the ICA SUV 2013 Conference Programme Committee Chair via e-mail at:  szary@email.unc.edu

Conference Programme Committee

Richard Szary (szary@email.unc.edu)

Sharon Alexander-Gooding, The UWI, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados and Local Chair (sharon.alexander-gooding@cavehill.uwi.edu)

John Aarons – The UWI University Archivist, Jamaica (john.aarons@uwimona.edu.jm)

Cherri-Ann Beckles The UWI-Federal Archives Centre, Barbados (cabeckles@yahoo.com)

Bryan Corbett (bryan.corbett@ualberta.ca)

Charlotte Maday (charlotte.maday@univ-paris-diderot.fr)

Juliane Mikoletzky (juliane.mikoletzky@tuwien.ac.at)

Eli Hjorth Reksten (eli.hjorth.reksten@liu.se)

Patricia Whatley (p.e.whatley@dundee.ac.uk)

 

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Conference announcement: Call for Papers,

 

Democratising or privileging: the future of access to archives

 

25-26 April 2013

Apex Hotel, Dundee, Scotland

 

The Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) at the University of Dundee invites proposals for a conference being held on 25-26 April 2013. As patterns of access change and more archival materials and finding aids are placed online there is a perception that access is becoming more difficult. The conference will examine the extent to which that view varies according to user type and issues and trends relating to access to archives: on site, remotely and virtually.

 

The conference will bring together information professionals and a range of users; academic, professional and individual.

 

Proposals should relate to any of the sub-themes below:

 

  1. Online access to archives, the impact on traditional services
  2. Access to originals: are archive services fit for purpose?
  3. Selection for digitisation: criteria and impact on historical record
  4. Major commercial online resources for family history and the archival and research implications of what is missing
  5. Should different types of user be privileged?
  6. Location of collections: does it matter?
  7. Public History and wider policy issues: access and ethical issues
  8. What should users pay for?: changing models of charging
  9. Community and user participation in developing access to archives
  10. Who controls access to archives: closure and access to sensitive information?

 

Proposals for individual 20-30 minute presentations or panel sessions of up to three speakers will be considered and should be submitted by Friday 30 November 2012 to Patricia Whatley, Director, Centre for Archive and Information Studies at p.e.whatley@dundee.ac.uk.

 

All submissions must contain:

 

a) Title of submission

b) Conference sub-theme

c) Name of speaker(s)

d) Affiliation of speaker(s)

e) Address(es) of speakers(s)

f) E-mail address(es) of speaker(s)

g) Abstract (250-350 words)

h) Short biography containing employment, research interests, publications

i) Audio-visual equipment required

 

·         All abstracts should be submitted in English, checked for correct grammar and spelling and e-mailed in Microsoft Word format.

·         All submissions will be reviewed by the Conference Committee and those successful will be notified within two weeks after the deadline for submission .

·         Sponsored bursaries: A number of bursaries will be available, which will cover registration, accommodation and a contribution to travel costs. More details will be issued in the next few months.

·         Accepted presenters will be entitled to a 50% reduction in the registration fees (excluding conference dinner).

 

Target audience:

  • Archivists and other information specialists
  • Historians and other academics
  • Family historians
  • Museum curators
  • Policy makers
  • The media

 

Conference registration fees:

Full conference, including conference dinner – £95

Two days, conference only – £65

One day, conference only – £35

Conference dinner, Apex Hotel – £30

 

Accommodation and travel:

A limited number of rooms will be available at the Apex Hotel for conference delegates at the conference rate. In addition, a wide range of accommodation is available in Dundee close to the Apex Hotel.

 

Dundee is on the main east coast rail line from London. Direct daily flights from Dundee to  London City and Birmingham are available.

Sponsors and bursaries:

Conference sponsors include:

  • College of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Dundee
  • School of Humanities, University of Dundee
  • Dundee Convention Bureau
  • The Scottish Council on Archives
  • The Economic and Social History Society of Scotland

A range of conference bursaries are available for delegates and speakers. More information will be available on the conference web site in January.

Keynote speakers include:

  • Dr Caroline Shenton, Archivist and historian
  • Chris Paton, Genealogist and researcher
Call for Papers

International Academic Conference on Holocaust Research
University of Toronto
October 6-7, 2013

NEW SCHOLARS/NEW RESEARCH ON THE HOLOCAUST

Date:            October 6-7, 2013
Location:        University of Toronto
Sponsors:        Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies and
the Centre for Jewish Studies of the University of Toronto, and the Government
of Canada
Context:         Coinciding with the meeting of the Task Force for
International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research
(ITF), an inter-governmental organization established in 1998 and meeting in
Toronto under the chairmanship of the Government of Canada.
Language:       English

Organized by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies and
the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto, and the Government
of Canada, this international academic conference will showcase and consider
new Holocaust-related research by new scholars in the field.   By
“new scholars” the organizers have in mind advanced
doctoral candidates and those who have received doctoral degrees within the
past decade or so, but we will interpret these parameters flexibly. New
scholarship might include: comparative studies; topics that draw upon recently
released sources; gender, economic and religious and cultural aspects of the
Holocaust; local studies that impact wider interpretations; contributions of
media and literature to an understanding of the Holocaust; and other innovative
and/or interdisciplinary topics.

We plan to assemble researchers who have studied, thought and written about the
Holocaust from many different vantage points, in order to engage with one
another across disciplinary and national borders. Our Academic Advisory
Committee, co-chaired by Professors Doris Bergen and Michael Marrus, includes
Professors Alain Goldschlager, Irving Abella, Jennifer Evans, Dorota Glowacka,
Amanda Grzyb, Jan Grabowski, John-Paul Himka, Sara Horowitz, Robert Jan van
Pelt, and Dr. Naomi Azrieli.

We invite proposals to participate in this meeting.

The sponsors will cover expenses for travel and accommodation for those who
will be presenting papers. Our intention is to circulate papers to participants
beforehand for commentary and discussion.  Presenters will summarize their
papers at the meeting and all invitees will participate in critical discussion.

Kindly email your proposals, which should be no more than 300 words, together
with a short (max. 2-page) curriculum vitae, to Elizabeth McCann
(elizabeth.mccann@cic.gc.ca) before April 30, 2013.

Please write “ITF” in the subject line and attach your
proposal and c.v. as a combined file, preferably in pdf format. Applicants will
be notified by June 2013.

Stacy Hushion
PhD Candidate
Department of History
University of Toronto
stacy.hushion@mail.utoronto.ca

 

Library Closures

Library Closures

The following report has just been published by the House of Commons – Culture, Media and Sport Committee, namely `Library Closures:  HC 587, Third Report of Session 2012-13 – Volume I: Report, Together with Formal Minutes, Oral and Written Evidence.’

From the Report Summary:

‘Library Closures (HC 587)’ reports on how recent campaigns against the closure of local libraries have highlighted the strong attachment that many people feel to their library services; however, much of the focus of the campaigns has been on library branches rather than the question of preservation and possible enhancement of the library service.

Reductions in opening hours and the loss of professional staff may damage the service more than the closure of particular buildings. The provision of a library service is a statutory duty, but a number of councils have drawn up plans that fail to comply with the requirement to provide a comprehensive and efficient service.

A full assessment of the needs of the local population for the services is key; guidance on how to assess local needs does exist, but more must be done to disseminate it.

Although the future of public libraries may be uncertain there is an opportunity for the reassessment of their roles and how they are organised. The Committee saw many examples of innovative thinking about what libraries can offer to the local population, and a number of models of how those services might be provided. Councils which have transferred the running of libraries to community volunteers must continue to provide support, otherwise failure may be viewed as closures by stealth.

The Committee looks forward to the report due by the end of 2014, on the cumulative effect on library services as a result of the cuts in local authority provision, and the promotion of alternatives, such as the transfer to community volunteers.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: TSO Bookshop)

 

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Archives and Records Association Annual Conference 

 

CARDIFF, Wales, United Kingdom

28th – 30th August 2013

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Accountability, Culture and Ethics’

The Archives and Records Association UK & Ireland is pleased to announce a call for papers for the 2013 conference to be held in Cardiff, August 2013.

 

Records and archives play a key role in holding organisations to account and providing justice while also acting as an important educational and cultural resource. This conference will examine these different aspects of records and archives and the consequent roles and responsibilities of recordkeepers and conservators.

 

The conference will have two streams (archives and records management / conservation) but we will encourage crossovers between them. We welcome suggestions for papers, panels, case studies, debates and workshops on the following themes.

 

Archives and Records Management

  • Why do we keep records and archives and which of the following are priorities?
  • as evidence, to ensure accountability, to promote democracy and justice, and to protect people’s rights?
  • to create and protect identities and personal and societal memories, as an educational and cultural resource?
  • What are the responsibilities of archivists and records managers to their collections, stakeholders, institutions, and society?  Are they changing? Should we be keepers or activists? Whistleblowers?
  • Are there practical, moral and ethical tensions between these roles and responsibilities?
  • How can we contribute to accountability, social justice and culture in practice? Can we do this alone or do we need to acknowledge and form partnerships?
  • How can we ensure the reliability of our collections as evidence, particularly in a digital world increasingly reliant on social media and the Cloud?
  • Shred, delete or save? Does destruction erode trust? Should we bow to pressure to save less? If we save how do we balance access with privacy and confidentiality? What is the public interest?
  • Are we ourselves accountable? Is our profession diverse, do we promote equality? Are we educated and trained to behave ethically as contributors to accountability and culture?

Conservation

  • Do we have to accept compromise or should we work to the ideal?
  • Key ethical dilemmas: reversibility, removal of evidence, documentation, priorities and selection
  • Decision making: are we aiming to be accountable? for the greater good in society? to provide access to cultural material?
  • What should we know?: education and accreditation; research and development; the wider preservation world; new techniques and methods
  • Funding, partnerships and project successes: is money allocated in the right places? who is in control?
  • Are we entrenched in a digitisation culture, do we still care about original, first generation material?  What should we conserve?

The programme is flexible and session lengths will be decided once papers have been chosen but please note that individual speakers will generally have no longer than 30 minutes for their presentations.

 

Submitting your proposal:

 

Please submit your proposal, in the format suggested below, to:

 

Caroline Brown (Archives and Records Management stream)

Chair, ARA Conference 2013

c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

01382 388773

 

Mark Allen (Conservation stream)

mark_allen@flintshire.gov.uk

01244 532 364

 

The deadline for submission of proposals is:  17th December 2011.

Submissions will be considered by the Programme Sub-committee in December, and invitations to speak will be confirmed by the Committee by February 2012. Speakers will be reimbursed travel expenses and will receive free conference registration for the day on which they are speaking.

●             Try to connect your proposal to the theme of the conference as best you can. The theme is designed for speakers to bring topics to light that touch on contemporary issues

●             Try to be creative with your paper! How will your paper stimulate debate?

●             Please provide as full information as you can about your proposal – this helps the Committee in making choices about papers and scheduling of sessions

●             Try to be relevant and representative: consider looking at a topic from opposing viewpoints, or focus on the broader picture rather than institutionally specific ones

●             If you are considering making a group submission for a session, try to mix speakers from different backgrounds and institutions, or try to include a user or customer perspective

 

Your proposal should include the following:

 

-                      Name of proposer (or lead contact for group proposals)

-                      Institution

-                      Contact details

Address

Telephone

Email

Fax

-                      Submission title (or working title)

-                      Speakers (if a panel session)

-                      Session description (brief description, max 250 words)

-                      Special equipment needed (AV equipment etc)

-                      Any other information

 

For further information, or if you have any further questions, please

contact:

 

Caroline Brown

Chair, ARA Conference 2013

e-mail:  c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

phone: 01382 388773

 

We look forward to seeing you in Cardiff next year as a speaker or as a delegate!

 

 

International Journal of Social Research Methodology

International Journal of Social Research Methodology

The latest Table of Contents for the International Journal of Social Research Methodology, namely Volume 15, Issue 4, 2012, is now available online.  This is a special issue of the journal, investigating `Perspectives on working with archived textual and visual material in social research.’
This volume includes a number of interesting articles, including:

Dilemmas in Archiving Contemporary Material: the example of the British Library
By Jude England and Simone Bacchini.

Abstract: The dilemmas faced by institutions in archiving contemporary materials are exemplified by current practices at the British Library. With a growing collection aiming to be comprehensive and of use to researchers, tensions between selectivity and universality in acquisition are soon brought to the fore. Similarly, a sensible collection strategy must balance the demands of openness against the needs for privacy.

Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13645579.2012.687572

 

Recent Developments in Archiving Social research.
By Louise Corti.

Abstract:  Recent developments in archiving have built on a 50 year foundation of sharing social survey data and are enabling the take-up of data curation practices on a wider scale. Advances in data archiving have been driven by the quest for comparable and harmonised data sources and mandates from sponsors of research to make data accessible – to provide both transparency and to maximise re-use value. In this paper, I discuss four recent developments that are bringing challenges for social science data archives: methods for archiving qualitative data; providing safe access to disclosive data; institutional data archiving initiatives; and dealing with the emergence of ‘new’ data types.

Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13645579.2012.688310

 

Data and the Archives: The Internet as site and subject
By Fiona Gill and Catriona Elder

Abstract: The Internet has changed the nature of the archive from a paper-based treasure trove overseen by the trained archivist to one of an open, multi-vocal, democratic source with no one in control. New forms of archives have emerged – for example, the haphazard collection of ephemeral – and they now exist alongside the formal public record that has more traditionally been understood as the archive. This article analyses what these changes mean to social scientists working with data that emerge from or are stored on the Internet. Using a small case study based on our own research, we consider ways of thinking through and managing this challenge. We suggest this shift from the institutional to the intimate, from the state to the individual, from the public to the private has changed the way scholars access and interact with data.

Link:  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13645579.2012.687595
For the full Table of Contents, Click on the Following Link:  http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tsrm20/15/4

 

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

Beyond BordersReport on:

Beyond Borders: San Diego 2012 – the 76th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archivists

Beyond Borders - Full Programme

Beyond Borders – Full Programme

During early August 2012, at the height of the Olympic glow in the East End of London where I live and work, it seemed almost surreal to be preparing myself for a trip to the West Coast of the United States in order to attend the 76th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to be held in San Diego.  I had been very fortunate to receive a bursary from the Section for International Engagement at the Archives and Records Association in order for me to be able to attend the Conference, and several months after originally being approached to submit a panel paper, it was hard to believe that the time to fly had actually come.

My background is as the Archivist responsible for…

View original 1,520 more words

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

Launch of the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives

House of Lords, Monday 15th October 2012

Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives

Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives

On Monday 15th October 2012 I was fortunate to be able to attend the Launch of the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives, (CVSA) at the House of Lords.  The Campaign launch was sponsored by Baroness Pitkeathley and funded by The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund.

The idea for the Campaign originated with the Voluntary Action History Society (VAHS) who have long been aware of the importance of the Archives of charities and voluntary sector organisations, both large and small, the importance of helping to preserve these collections for future generations.  Indeed, a survey conducted by the VAHS in the 1990s of larger voluntary organisations indicated there were significant issues faced by these organisations in continuing to preserving their archives and to make them available for…

View original 911 more words

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Comma, International Journal on Archives: Open Call for Papers 

Write an article for Comma and reach archivists around the world!

Following a number of thematic and regionally-focused volumes, submissions are now invited for  two general issues to be published in late 2013/2014.

Comma   has a global circulation, reaching professionals in more than 190 countries.  It publishes primarily in English and in French with abstracts provided in the seven ICA languages (English, French, Spanish, German, Russian, Mandarin, and Arabic). Submission should be of relevance to this international readership in terms of professional practice and/or theoretical developments or their application.  We also welcome comparative studies and articles relating to activity by international organizations (case studies relating to activities within one country will not usually be accepted).

Comma is not routinely peer-reviewed but the service is available on request and articles published after peer-review will be flagged as such.

There are two deadlines for submission: 30 June 2013 and 30 September 2013.  Prospective authors may wish to contact the Editor-in-Chief, Margaret Procter, mprocter@liv.ac.uk to discuss articles before submission.  Authors wishing to submit in French (or any other ICA language) will also be referred on to the relevant language/area member of the Editorial Board.

Guidelines for authors (French/English) can be found at                http://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/images/stories/documents/commafrench.doc  and               http://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/images/stories/documents/commaenglish.doc

Articles should be submitted, as e-mail attachments, to Mrs Nathalie Florent, florent@ica.org

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Posted on behalf of the British Records Association

BRA Conference 2012

Jewels in the Crown? The Archives of Empire

This year’s conference will be held on Monday 10th December 2012 at the Swedenborg Society, Swedenborg House, 20/21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

The British empires affected millions of people across the world over four centuries, so what sort of records were created and where are they? What evidence has been kept and what destroyed? How do official records relate to the surviving unofficial and personal papers? What role have the custodians of records played and can the collections offer new insights for researchers in the 21st century? These are some of the issues our speakers, who are both archivists and historians, will discuss. The speakers are:

John Fisher, University of the West of England

Tom Lawson, University of Winchester

Lucy McCann, Bodleian Library of Commonwealth & African Studies at Rhodes House

Antonia Moon, British Library

Rachel Rowe, Smuts Librarian for South African and Commonwealth Studies, Cambridge

Terry Suthers MBE, Harewood House

We are delighted that The Maurice Bond Lecture this year will be given by Peter Hennessy, Lord Hennessy of Nympsfield, on ‘The Great Power Impulse; the pleasures and pains of archival research and on becoming an item at Kew’. As usual, this is a public lecture at the end of the day, open without charge to those who cannot manage to attend the other papers.

BRA Conferences are stimulating and informative; they afford an opportunity to step back and consider the nature and research value of  the archives we keep.  And there is time over a buffet lunch and refreshment breaks to discuss matters of common concern and interest.

The charge is £53 for members and £63 for non members of the BRA. There is also a discount rate of £26 for students and unwaged.

A full programme, further details and a registration form may be found on the BRA website at http://www.britishrecordsassociation.org.uk/forms/BRA2012Conferenceleafletdraft7.docx.pdf

Further information may be obtained from Maria Evans, Office Manager, 020 7833 0428, info@britishrecordsassociation.org.uk

Contact the list owner for assistance at ARCHIVES-NRA-request@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

For information about joining, leaving and suspending mail (eg during a holiday) see the list website at
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=archives-nra

 

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

Association of Canadian Archivists 2013 Annual Conference:

Community as Archives, Archives as Community

Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

13 – 15 June 2013

 

Communities are the framework of our identities, our history and our lives. Online and offline, connected by geography, ethnicity, language, sexuality, interests, professions, friendship and kin, our lives are a lattice of communities.

 

Join us in Winnipeg, city of communities and meeting places, for an exploration of how archival consciousness arises in communities and how community consciousness has arisen among archivists. We invite proposals related to all areas of archival theory or practice and pertaining to any and all media. These contributions can come from anyone involved with archives: from archival staff and volunteers, from those who share an interest in archives, whether as a community organizer, researcher, creator, a professional or an academic, and from anyone who considers themselves to be a knowledge worker.

 

Topics might include:

  • Archives as Community: What issues are important to the Canadian archival community right now? How can we act together to achieve our goals?
  • Community Archives: What is a community archive? What is participatory archiving? How do we build collections and staff that are broadly representative of Canadian society?
  • Archives and Indigenous Communities: How can archival practice engage with Indigenous knowledge traditions? How can archives build healthy relationships with Canadian Indigenous communities?
  • Alternative Archives: Do certain communities treat archives in a particular way? How is the concept of “archives” reinterpreted (as a space, or as an idea)?
  • Virtual Communities, Virtual Archives: What are the challenges and opportunities of social media as collaborative tools? How do we create archives for digital natives? How can archives participate in open source and standards communities?

 

SUBMITTING PROPOSALS:

The 2013 Conference Program Committee invites contributions in a variety of traditional and nontraditional formats including:

 

1. Traditional session: formal presentation of papers; approximately 20 minutes per speaker, with questions to follow as time allows.

 

2. Panel discussion: abbreviated presentation of papers; approximately 10-15 minutes per speaker, with discussion to follow.

 

3. Roundtable: brief 5-7 minute presentations with open discussion

 

4. Focused Debate on a specific topic: brief presentations with open discussion & debate to follow. Can adhere to formal debating rules or not.

 

5. Pecha Kucha Session: 8-12 presenters have 20 slides, each shown for 20 seconds on a timer. Thus, each presenter has just 6 minutes and 40 seconds to explain their ideas.

Use the “Call for Submission” button on the ACA website at http://www.archivists.ca/.  Submitting your session proposal in electronic form using this link is strongly encouraged.

The deadline for these proposals isSaturday, September 29th, 2012

Note: Please be advised there will be a Call for Student Papers as well as a Call for Posters later this year, with submission deadlines early in 2013.

 

WORKSHOP PROPOSALS:

For 2013, ACA will use the “Call for Submission” button for any workshop proposals that will be associated with the Annual Conference; these submissions will go to the Professional Learning Committee, which will make its decisions in mid October 2012.

Workshop is defined as a full 1-day or 2-day event, generally combining presentations, group discussions and hands-on activities for a group of about 25 – 30 participants.  Workshops can cover any topic/subject, and may not be related directly to the conference theme.

Questions:

Please feel free to direct questions to:
Johanna Smith
Chair, ACA 2013 Conference Program
c/o Library and Archives Canada
550 blvd de la Cité
Gatineau, QC K1A 0N4
Telephone:  613-897-4742
Fax: 819-934-6800
johanna.smith@bac-lac.gc.ca

archivists.ca/content/annual-conference

 

Two recently published news articles further investigating the discovery of the Archives of the former Tunisian Government’s secret police.

Links to the News Stories as follows:

  • “The UK Foreign Office is holding a conference to explain how it will finally place into the public domain millions of public records that it has unlawfully held for decades – but is refusing to allow members of the public to attend.

    Selected historians and archivists have been invited to the event on 9 May, known as Records Day, but the FCO has said it will not admit the public or media.

    Meanwhile, a basic inventory of the 1.2m files that have been posted on a government website has been altered, with all references to the cold war spies Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean having disappeared. An earlier version of the inventory made clear that the withheld files on the two men took up more than 4 metres of shelving.”

    tags: archives

  • “In my last blog post I wrote about how the UK government Web Archive (UKGWA) can be a useful resource for contemporary historians. It represents changing forms of communication used by the government and an opportunity to compare an official record provided at the time with a secret official record released 20 years later.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “The UK Foreign Office is holding a conference to explain how it will finally place into the public domain millions of public records that it has unlawfully held for decades – but is refusing to allow members of the public to attend.

    Selected historians and archivists have been invited to the event on 9 May, known as Records Day, but the FCO has said it will not admit the public or media.

    Meanwhile, a basic inventory of the 1.2m files that have been posted on a government website has been altered, with all references to the cold war spies Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean having disappeared. An earlier version of the inventory made clear that the withheld files on the two men took up more than 4 metres of shelving.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “My time at London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) is near its end, and I have been looking back at that year wondering what, out of the many skills and insights I’ve picked up, would be the one most important lesson. And what kept popping up in my head was ‘the power of archives’.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “My time at London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) is near its end, and I have been looking back at that year wondering what, out of the many skills and insights I’ve picked up, would be the one most important lesson. And what kept popping up in my head was ‘the power of archives’.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

  • “I have a new law review article (available here) entitled “The Lost Archives of Noriega: Emancipating Panamanian Human Rights Documents in U.S. Military Custody” just published by the Boston University International Law Journal. The article discusses the fate and legal status of over six million pages of records seized by U.S. forces in Panama that continue to sit in a military warehouse in Albany, Georgia. “

    tags: archives

  • “One of the tricks to working in an interdisciplinary field like digital preservation is that all too often we can be using the same terms but not actually talking about the same things. In my opinion, the most fraught term in digital preservation discussions is “archive.” At this point, it has come to mean a lot of different things in different contexts. It can mean so many different things that some in digital preservation are reluctant to use the term writ large. I wanted to spend a few moments putting text on a URL that anyone can reference from here on out when they need to try and parse and disambiguate what we mean by archive. For a some related reading, I’d suggest checking out Kate Theimer’s Archives in Context and as Context and the role of “the professional discipline” in archives and digital archives.”

    tags: archives

  • ” A couple of years ago, he took over as the head of Israel’s state archives. Among the millions of papers in those archives are some Israeli state secrets.

    But the new state archivist is on a mission to declassify more documents than ever before.

    I traveled to Jerusalem’s industrial zone, where the archives are located. It’s a jumble of steakhouses and car dealerships, furniture showrooms and one large fenced-in building protecting millions of pieces of paper.”

    tags: archives

  • “The artifacts and important manuscripts that are today known as “the Jewish Archive” had been lying — for dozens of years — away from the public eye in a basement inside the headquarters of the Iraqi intelligence services, in storage conditions that do not meet international standards. This had caused many of the documents to be damaged.”

    tags: archives news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,474 other followers