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BRITISH RECORDS ASSOCIATION in conjunction with the HISTORIC HOUSES ARCHIVISTS GROUP

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2 DECEMBER 2014

‘Upstairs, downstairs: life in British stately homes and town houses’

Here is a date for your diaries. The BRA’s annual conference 2014 – arranged this year in conjunction with the Historic Houses Archivists Group – will take place on 2 December.

Through the generosity of the Duke of Northumberland, our venue is the magnificent Syon House. The conference will be covering a fascinating and diverse range of aspects of life in British great houses, such as nannies, servants, stuffed animals, domestic technology and much more, while our expert speakers will include Christine Hiskey, Katherine Holden, Pat Morris, Jeremy Musson and Pamela Sambrook.

Further details about the conference and how to book your place will be publicised soon. It promises to be a fascinating, memorable and popular day; and there’s likely to be a high demand for places, so get the date in your diary now and watch out for more news about how to make sure of your place on the day!

Dr Anthony Smith
Chairman, British Records Association

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Originally posted on CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group:

The full programme for our 2014 conference Metadata: Making an Impact can now be found on our website.

We look forward to seeing many of you there for what promises to be an informative three days.

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Originally posted on Brunel Special Collections:

Guest post by Emma Filtness, Creative Writing Tutor

Over the course of this academic year, I have run two more writing workshops with Brunel’s Special Collections. The first involved a session with the Creative Writing class from the Brunel Arts Centre – a mix of staff, students and members of the public – the second with the London Borough of Hillingdon’s Creative Writing group based at Uxbridge Library.

The participants spent an evening browsing a selection of materials from across the collections. The materials were introduced by Katie Flanagan, Special Collections Librarian, who provided the writers with some information on the specific item and the archive or collection it was from, including entries from The Burnett Archive of Working-Class Autobiogrpahies, editions of the Ladies’ Home Journal from the 1940s and 1950s, items from the South Asian Diaspora Arts Archive (SADAA) and books and memorabilia from the Channel Tunnel…

View original 372 more words

CALL FOR PAPERS EXTENDED: Forbidden Access: Censoring Books and Archives

Institute of English Studies/Senate House Library/Institute of Advanced Legal Studies: University of London: 6-7 November 2014

IESEvents

Jon Millington

Events Officer

Institute of English Studies

University of London

School of Advanced Study

Room 239, 2nd Floor South Block
Senate House

Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Tel: +44 (0)20 7664 4859

Fax: +44 (0)20 7862 8720

Email: jon.millington

http://ies.sas.ac.uk

The University of London is an exempt charity in England and Wales.

We are committed to achieving a 20% cut in emissions from University buildings by 2015. Please think before you print.

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Originally posted on UCA Archives:

Videos and transcripts on understanding and researching archives have been released, as part of a series for researchers to understand how to approach archives and special collections. Issues with approaching archives, include that the word archive has many different definitions  to different people, and the structure of an archive catalogue, as opposed to a library catalogue may be hard to understand and search.

The webpage can be found here

The videos so far look at ‘What is an Archive’ and an archive catalogue structure – why can’t an archive be catalogued on a library catalogue?

View original

Dear all,

Just a reminder about this year’s Community Archive conference which will once again be at UCL on June 12th, co-hosted by the UCL-DIS and the Community Archives and Heritage Group. The keynote speaker will be Professor Lisa Jardine, Director of the UCL Centre for Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Projects and the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL). The theme of this year’s conference is communication and will focus on how community archives have used technologies to communicate their passion and interest in community heritage. As usual the conference is free and includes lunch but we do require delegates to pre-register. Further details and registration can be found at http://www.communityarchives.org.uk/page_id__1312_path__.aspx

If there are any further questions, please do not hesitate to get at touch.

Best wishes, Andrew

Dr Andrew Flinn
Reader in Archival Studies & Director of Archives and Records Management MA programmes
Department of Information Studies
University College London
London
WC1E 6BT
a.flinn

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CfP: The Practice of Historical Research. Continuity and Change of the Production of Historical Knowledge in Archives and Libraries in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

If you are interested in the historical practice of research in 18th / 19th century Europe then this conference will be of interest:

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=213762 .

The aim of the conference is to explore changes and continuities in the practice of historical research during the transition period from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century. The conference centres on the performance of historical research as well as the making of historical facts in everyday research, paying particular attention to the study of files and records kept in archives and libraries. The emphasis on everyday practices draws explicitly on recent developments in the history of science. Traditionally, the history of historiography dwelled chiefly on the study of narratives and textual representations of the past. As an important addition to these established perspectives, the conference will examine the performance of historical research and the circumstances under which historians generated knowledge about the past.


Dr. Philipp Müller, Seminar für Mittlere und Neuere Geschichte, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Symposium Archives and History, 26.-28 Juni

CFP Practice of Historical Research, MPI History of Science

Professor Elizabeth Shepherd, PhD

Professor, Archives and Records Management

Director of Research

Department of Information Studies

University College London

Gower Street

London WC1E 6BT

tel + 44 020 7679 2945

fax + 44 020 7383 0557

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/infostudies/elizabeth-shepherd/

DIS is in Foster Court, Ground Floor, on the main UCL campus in Gower Street.

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  • “A much-debated artifacts collection from the historical Jewish community in Baghdad that was slated to return to Iraq will remain in the United States for an additional two years, following last week’s announcement of an agreement between Iraqi officials and the U.S. State Department.

    The agreement extends the exhibit of a selection of the artifacts, which is touring the U.S. and has already been displayed at New York City’s Museum of Jewish Heritage as well as the National Archives in Washington, DC. Previously, the artifacts were scheduled to return to Iraq in June.”

    tags:archives

  • “The prevalent opinion among Iraqi Jews — a community from which I hail on my father’s side — has been that the books, photographs, scrolls, writings, and communal documents in this extraordinary collection should remain in America, rather than being returned to Iraq. I have argued that while this view couldn’t be faulted on legal or moral grounds, I nonetheless wished that the situation were different, and that Iraq could celebrate its Jewish heritage in the manner that European countries like Poland and Germany do theirs.”

    tags:archives

  • “Eastside Community Heritage will explore the lives of Jews who emigrated to Newham and surrounding boroughs, delving into stories about where their families are today.

    Judith Garfield, 47, of Bisson Road, Stratford is the executive director of Eastside Community Heritage and traces her family ancestry to the heart of the East End.

    “With this project we want to track down those who used to live here and where they have gone now.

    “It’s really important because the community is disappearing and dying out,” she said.”

    tags:archives

  • “JNS.org – When I last wrote about the archive of Jewish treasures from Iraq rescued by U.S. forces in Baghdad in 2003, I noted that the prevalent opinion among Iraqi Jews—a community from which I hail on my father’s side—was that the books, photographs, scrolls, writings, and communal documents in this extraordinary collection should remain in America, rather than being returned to Iraq. I then argued that while his view couldn’t be faulted on legal or moral grounds, I nonetheless wished that the situation were different, and that Iraq could celebrate its Jewish heritage in the manner that European countries like Poland and Germany do with theirs.

    Since the vexed question of who owns this collection, known as the “Iraqi Jewish Archive,” remains a live one, I want to outline some further thoughts on the issue. But before I do, it’s worth summarizing the current state of discussions over the archive between the U.S. and Iraqi governments.”

    tags:archives

  • “A much-debated artifacts collection from the historical Jewish community in Baghdad that was slated to return to Iraq will remain in the United States for an additional two years, following last week’s announcement of an agreement between Iraqi officials and the U.S. State Department.

    The agreement extends the exhibit of a selection of the artifacts, which is touring the U.S. and has already been displayed at New York City’s Museum of Jewish Heritage as well as the National Archives in Washington, DC. Previously, the artifacts were scheduled to return to Iraq in June.”

    tags:archives

  • “Calling the shots draws together a collection of archival Aboriginal photography, ranging from ‘touristic’ shots of Aboriginal men holding spears and women with their babies, through to staid studio portraits.

    Many of these historic photographs have been described as exploitative, taken for reproduction on postcards, or for ‘species documentation’.”

    tags:news archives

  • “That children should be exempted from war and political conflicts, regardless of their nationality and religious affiliation, is considered self-evident by most countries’ governments and non-governmental organisations. The number of nations that ratified the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child in 1989 is a clear sign of this. However, looking back historically, we can see that upholding this principle has been difficult. In the aftermath of the two world wars when nationalistic currents and political conflicts in Europe were strong, politics appear to have played an important role in determining how relief activities for children were performed.”

    tags:archives

  • “Tweets and YouTube videos will take their place alongside documents from some of Britain’s most important moments as the National Archives moves into social media.

    Thousands of posts about events like the birth of Prince George and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee have already been recorded to create online “snapshots”, and many more will be collected in the future.”

    tags:archives

  • “Capturing content published on blogs has been part of our everyday work for some time. Other social media platforms, such as Twitter and YouTube, are a challenge for traditional web archiving technology. They are highly interactive and instantaneous, and much of the technology that underpins them changes regularly. Social media services are primarily designed with immediate use in mind and, because the content is forever changing and being deleted, it is at a high risk of being lost forever.”

    tags:archives

  • “For someone who thinks about web archiving almost every day it’s sometimes hard to explain to people outside the digital library community why archiving web sites is worth doing. “They archive themselves,” some say. “Why would you want to save what’s on the Internet?” they wonder. Instead of launching into explanations about cultural heritage, dynamic publishing streams and comprehensive collection policies, I can now point to recent and fun examples of why we should be archiving the web and what it looks like to archive the web.
    Why?”

    tags:archives

  • “Historian Katie Engelhart reports on last week’s FCO ‘records day’ to discuss the fate of thousands of historic files, some containing evidence of murder and torture by colonial authorities “

    tags:news archives

  • “Toldot Yisrael, a Jerusalem- based nonprofit organization dedicated to recording the firsthand testimonies of men and women who helped found the State of Israel, unveiled on Wednesday a new partnership with the National Library of Israel.

    “These are people who are witnesses to history, people who were at the right place at the right time,” said Aryeh (Eric) Halivni, founder and executive director of Toldot Yisrael, at a press conference announcing the collaboration on Wednesday.”

    tags:news archives

  • “Over the past six months, I have been exploring various archives in Pakistan. For those who have never visited an archive department, imagine it to be a mixture, both in appearance and function, of a library, storage room and a sarkari daftar. “

    tags:archives

  • “GUIYANG, May 4 (Xinhua) — Ancient documents of the Miao and Dong ethnic groups in southwest China’s Guizhou Province need protecting as they are being ruined from natural and man-made disasters.

    The documents, called “Jinping Writs”, refer to the original records of contracts, account books, government reports, genealogy and county regulations in Jinping and its neighboring counties in Guizhou. “

    tags:archives

  • “For the 20th anniversary of the first democratic elections in South Africa on the 27th April a website has been launched recording the history of the Anti-Apartheid Movement in Britain. Funded by the Amiel & Melburn Trust and the Heritage Lottery Fund, ‘Forward to Freedom: The History of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement, 1959-1994′ (www.aamarchives.org) summarises the history of the Movement and makes freely available a selection of documents and other items held in the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) Archive in the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, and some items from other repositories and in private collections. Exhibition boards based on the website are available for loan and an education pack for schools (Key Stage 3) is in development.”

    tags:archives

  • “In 2013, Maurice Shohet, an Iraqi Jew who now lives in Washington, D.C., received a surprising email from the National Archives. A librarian had recovered his elementary school record that was left behind nearly 40 years ago when he and his family fled Iraq. The record is part of a cache of thousands of personal documents and religious texts that were found at the start of the Iraq War, drowning in the cellar of a building run by one of the world’s most wanted men.”

    tags:archives

  • “A project run by the British Library, intended to help preserve and extend access to historically significant archives around the world, will allow researchers and the general public to access ancient and valuable manuscripts from Palestinian institutions.”

    tags:archives

  • “The basement of the bombed-out Iraqi intelligence headquarters was dark, hot and flooded.

    Severed wires hung from the ceiling and dead animals floated in the water that filled the gloomy hallways. The building’s top floors had been crushed by US bombs dropped weeks earlier and it seemed possible that the whole structure could collapse at any time.

    But the soldiers from Mobile Exploitation Team Alpha, the American unit tasked with hunting for Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction, waded on into the darkness. “

    tags:archives

  • “The photo is one of 525,000 in the agency’s archive being digitized to preserve a record of one of the world’s most entrenched refugee problems, created in what the Palestinians call the “Nakba,” or “catastrophe” — their uprooting in the war over Israel’s 1948 creation.

    As Palestinians mark the Nakba’s 66th anniversary Thursday, the photos tell the story of the refugee crisis’ transition from temporary to seemingly permanent. Tent camps of the 1950s have turned into urban slums with some alleys so narrow residents can only walk single file past drab multi-story buildings.”

    tags:archives

  • “A deal between the US State department and the Iraqi government appears to have been struck to keep the Iraqi-Jewish archive in the US, the World Organisation of Jews from Iraq (WOJI) has announced.

    The archive, as the collection of 2,700 restored Jewish books and thousands of documents is known, is due to return to Iraq after the ‘Discovery and Recovery’ exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York closes this week. “

    tags:archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Originally posted on CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group:

CIG are pleased to announce that booking is now open for our 2014 conference – Metadata : Making an Impact.

With the rise of RDA, the development of BIBFRAME and the ever-increasing pressure on library budgets, traditional metadata is undergoing something of a transformation. New models are emerging as technologies change and the way we think about metadata is evolving as well. Moreover, good metadata provides much more than just tidy catalogue records; it underpins the entirety of a user’s experience and has the potential to help or hinder. So where next? What impact will these changes have? And how can this best be maximized in terms of ‘adding value’ to your organization? The 2014 conference aims to stimulate debate around the impact that metadata has, and can have, on cataloguers, cataloguing teams and institutions.

The conference will run from 1:30pm on September 8th to 1:30pm on September 10th, with…

View original 127 more words

Originally posted on MarkjOwen's Blog:

Landfill

Image via Wikipedia

I’ve just read an article in the May edition of the NZ CIO magazine.

The article describes a problem where 74% of the local public sector organisations admitted to holding some digital information they can no longer access”. This is incredible!

This means that out of every 100 pieces of digital information that they are holding, they can only use 26 of them! Why? Because they do not have a defined method for retaining and storing their digital information.

Archives New Zealand (a government organisation that is the “official guardian of New Zealand’s public archives) have been tasked with creating a digital continuity strategy. This will ensure that valuable information is preserved and migrated when necessary to the latest formats and media, appropriate metadata is attached, and documents that are no longer relevant are securely deleted.

Wow – that is precisely the way that they can improve the “findability” of digital information. Metadata that describes the…

View original 234 more words

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

 

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

 

A collaborative conference between The National Archives, Research Libraries UK and Arts Council England, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

 

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

 

Conference Brief

 

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

 

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by 1st July 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

 

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

To examine methods of ensuring the discoverability of material as a means of mapping collections. What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

 

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

 

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

 

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

 

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

 

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

 

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

 

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

 

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

 

Conference Essential Details

 

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

 

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

 

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

 

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

 

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required. Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK. A charge applies to attend the Conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1). More information and details regarding registration will be posted here shortly: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/visit/events-elsewhere.htm

 

List members might be interested in this one-day conference – an interesting topic, and with Natalie Zemon Davis as keynote speaker. No precise venue is given, but probably UCL, as that is where the host group is based.

London, 30 October 2014 (submission date for papers 30 July 2014)

“We welcome proposals on any aspect of early modern archival work, manuscript or print, covering the period 1500-1750.”

“The Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) is pleased to announce ‘Failure in the Archives’, a conference celebrating the frustrations of archival research, to be held on 30 October 2014 and featuring a keynote address by Natalie Zemon Davis.

‘Failure in the Archives’ will provide a forum to examine everything that doesn’t belong in traditional conferences and publications, from dead-end research trips to unanswered questions.

How do we respond to the resistance, or worse, the silences and gaps, that we find in the archives? Scholarship tends toward success stories, but this conference seeks presentations from a range of disasters that arise when navigating the depths of the archive: damaged, destroyed, mislabelled, misrepresented materials, forgeries, exaggerated significance, and gaps in the historical record. …

We welcome proposals on any aspect of early modern archival work, manuscript or print, covering the period 1500-1750. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Materials which challenge cataloguing standards
  • Uncatalogued material – how to find it, how to access it, how to use it
  • Inaccurate cataloguing – tensions between past and present.
  • Broken or dispersed collections
  • Damaged, destroyed, or compromised collections
  • The ethics of maintaining archives
  • The ethics of archival research – especially when working with sensitive material
  • Absences and silences in the archive
  • Difficulties conserving and preserving materials
  • Conflicts of information between archival sources
  • Digitisation and its discontents
  • Agents in the archives: collectors, archivists, researchers …”

For more, see http://failureinthearchives.wordpress.com/

Regards,

Rachel Hardiman

linkedin.com/pub/rachel-hardiman/22/915/45b

twitter.com/Paradoxographer

uva.academia.edu/RachelHardiman

To view the list archives go to: jiscmail with the words UNSUBSCRIBE RECORDS-MANAGEMENT-UK For any technical queries re JISC please email helpline For any content based queries, please email RECORDS-MANAGEMENT-UK-request

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The Secret Archive: What is the significance of FCO’s ‘Migrated Archives’ and ‘Special Collections’? A conference at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London, on 29 May 2014

This conference will bring together historians, archivists, lawyers, journalists, civil servants and others concerned to examine the background to the long concealment by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of a huge collection of documentation created in the UK and in former British dependencies, and, more importantly, to consider the best means of securing its future survival and release into the public domain.

For further information and registration see: http://events.sas.ac.uk/icws/events/view/15504/, or telephone Olga Jimenez, 020 7862 8871

Dr Mandy Banton
Senior Research Fellow
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Senate House
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

CALL FOR PAPERS – please circulate

 

‘Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Forging collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and academia’

The Library of Birmingham, 29th and 30th October 2014

A collaborative conference between The National Archives and Research Libraries UK, in partnership with The Library of Birmingham and the Cadbury Research Library, University of Birmingham.

This conference follows on from the success and popularity of ‘Enhancing Impact, Inspiring Excellence: collaborative approaches between archives and universities’ held at The University of Birmingham in September 2013.

This year’s conference will explore the ‘discoverability’ of collections across different formats, institutions and professions. It will investigate the potential collections have for engaging with a range of communities, whether academic, socio-economic, or demographic.

Conference Brief

The last decade has witnessed the unprecedented development of partnerships and collaborative working across the heritage and cultural sectors. It has also seen universities and researchers refocus on the social, political and economic ‘impact’ of research. This has enabled greater opportunities for wider collaborative working between universities, academics and the wider heritage sector.

Whilst teaching and research partnerships are relatively well charted, less is known of how these collaborative efforts can transform our knowledge of collections and their ultimate presentation to wider society. This conference will explore inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches to developing and widening access to collections (their ‘discoverability’) through partnership working.

 

Call for Papers for Day 1: 29th October 2014

 

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers by Monday 30th June 2014. Paper abstracts should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

 

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

Speakers are invited to submit papers relating to a wide variety of topics, which explore the following [additional topics are welcome]:

 

The process of discovery: ‘finding collections, finding communities’

What methods and resources exist to enhance the discoverability of material? What resources can be used to ensure that collections, even across different institutions and disciplines, are not seen in isolation from one another?

Collecting: for whose sake?

Why do we acquire new material and how does collecting relate to teaching, research, and corporate priorities of universities and heritage organisations? Have these changed with the new research landscape? How do we ensure that vulnerable collections don’t slip through the net?

‘Out of the strong room and into the street’: Developing collections with communities

How can partnership working with new and emerging communities redefine the process of collecting, our understanding of collections, and their role within society? These communities can be defined by interest, geography, ethnically, or socio-demographically.

Demonstrating the impact of collections

How do we measure and subsequently demonstrate the social, cultural and economic impact collections can have?

‘Uniting the Stuff with the Stories’: cross-sector curation in partnership

How can collections be physically combined and presented to wider society whether through joint research projects, exhibitions or events?

Social media: virtual collecting and the new frontier of discovery?

What are the ways in which new forms of social media can be used to widen access and understanding of collections, wherever they are?

‘Are we in it together?’: Developing a national collections strategy

Is there a need for a national collections strategy to ensure the sustainable collecting of material across the HE and wider heritage sector? How can we all work more effectively together?

Workshop proposals for Day 2: 30th October 2014

Special interest groups are invited to submit proposals for a 2-hour workshop or round table discussion exploring some of the particular technical and logistic challenges of discoverability.

The organisers invite the submission of 300 word proposals for workshops stating their purpose, remit and intended audience. Workshops can explore specific issues relating to discoverability (e.g. bibliometrics) or broader topics (e.g. whether there’s scope for a national collecting strategy across the archival sector).

The deadline for proposals is Monday 30th June 2014. Proposals should be sent to both Melanie Cheung and Matt Greenhall:

Melanie Cheung, Research Libraries UK: melanie.cheung@rluk.ac.uk

Matt Greenhall, The National Archives: matt.greenhall@nationalarchives.gov.uk

Conference Essential Details

When: 29th and 30th October 2014

Where: Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad St, Birmingham, West Midlands B1 2ND.

Format: This year’s conference will be spread across two days, 29th and 30th October. The first day will explore the possibilities and methodologies of collection-based collaboration between archives, museums and universities, and is open to all those working across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors. The day will consist of a series of 20 minute presentations, key note speeches, open discussions, and networking opportunities.

Day two will consist on a series of focused workshops and round-table discussions hosted and delivered by individual interest groups. Workshops will focus upon the technical possibilities of discoverability and cross-collection collaboration and will be tailored to specific sector needs.

Fees and charges: There is no conference fee for this conference although registration is required (to be announced). Conference delegates are required to fund their travel and accommodation. Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days courtesy of RLUK.

A charge applies to attend the (optional) conference meal and networking event on the evening of 29th October (evening of day 1) to be held at the Library. Details and costs of the evening reception will be released at registration.

 

Digital Cultures: future thinking and innovation for arts and heritage
Monday 19 May 20149.30-4.30
Discovery Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne  


Produced by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums and Thinking Digital Arts
Formerly known as Bits2Blogs, Digital Cultures is an annual conference for anyone working in the arts and heritage sectors that is passionate about experimenting with new ideas and new technologies to inspire new audiences.

Digital Cultures will feature a range of thinkers from the cultural and digitalcreative sectors sharing innovative approaches to public engagement. Talks will explore open data and reuse cultures,co-curation, mobile and gaming technologies, interdisciplinary collaboration, the power of play, and will investigate the impact of creative technologies and the rise of digital industries on arts and heritage.

The final programme will be published very soon. The following speakers are confirmed:
Nora McGregor – Digital Curator in the Digital Scholarship Department (British Library)
Annette Mees – Co-Director (Coney)
Dr Noel Lobley – Sound Curator and Ethnomusicologist (Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford)
Irini Papadimitriou – Digital Programmes Manager (V&A)
Martha Henson – (Freelance Digital Producer/Science Museum)
Dominic Wilcox Artist and Designer (Dominic Wilcox.com)
Olga Mink Director (Baltan Labs)
John Bowers- Professor of Creative Digital Practice (Culture Lab, Newcastle University)
Marialaura Ghidini- Curator and Founder Director (Or-bits)
Beryl Graham – Professor of New Media Art at the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media, University of Sunderland (CRUMB)
More info and tickets from our Eventbrite here- http://bit.ly/1gG0jKY
A LIMITED NUMBER OF EARLY BIRD TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT THE SPECIAL RATE OF £40 (plus booking fee)

 

Under threat? Charity archives in the 21st century

Matthew McMurray (Royal Voluntary Service) and Philip Gale (The National Archives)

Institute of Education, 22 May 2014, 12.30-14.00

The records of voluntary sector organisations provide a unique perspective on social problems and social policy that is of value to voluntary sector staff, trustees and volunteersas well as to researchers and historians.

Yet, with ever growing pressure on Trustees to deliver their charity’s purpose in the most cost effective manner the archives of these organisations are in many cases marginalised, poorly resourced and even under the threat of disposal and destruction.

This talk by Matthew McMurray, archivist of Royal Voluntary Service and author of a new report on charity archives, will outline current evidence about voluntary sector archives in the UK based on his new research. Matthew’s talk will be followed by a response from Philip Gale of the National Archives.The seminaroffers a chance for wider discussion and exchange of ideas and information on the topic.

Venue: Library Teaching Room, Newsam Library and Archives, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

All welcome to this free event, but as places are limited please register in advance by emailing g.brewis@ioe.ac.uk

The event is organised in association with the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives, an initiative launched in 2012.

More information: http://www.ioe.ac.uk/newsEvents/97367.html

 

Event:

There are still a few places left on the next Copyright course being run by ARA Core Training, to be held 22 May in Cambridge. See details below:

Copyright in Practice
Perplexed by publication requests? Frightened of infringement?
If you’re wondering how best to navigate your way through a sea of copyright concerns, this could be just the course for you. The ARA Eastern Region is hosting a Core Training day on this very subject. Join us on Thursday 22 May, at Churchill College, Cambridge from 10am till 4pm (registration begins at 9.30am).

The morning session will cover current and forthcoming changes in legislation and how these will impact on archive services. The focus of the afternoon will be on practical examples from the region with talks on dealing with copyright at a college archive, issues with literary manuscripts and a case of infringement. Later, attendees will have the chance to work through some case studies before the day closes with a question and answer session with our panel. Our speakers will be Tim Padfield, Robert Athol, Chris Bennett and Richard Hunt.

Places cost £25 for ARA members and £40 for non-members (please note lunch is not included)

To book a place, please use the online booking form at http://www.archives.org.uk/events/viewevent.html?eventid=280 and quote the course code ‘C2014/002’. There are a total of 30 places available. The deadline for booking is Friday 9 May.

Bursaries may be available for those enrolled on the Registration Scheme. Please see http://www.archives.org.uk/registration-scheme/bursary-support.html for more information.

Course Programme

09.30 Registration (refreshments provided)
10.00     Welcome (introduction)
10.05 Understanding Copyright in Archives – Tim Padfield
12.00 – 1.00 Lunch (not provided, delegates can buy lunch at the Churchill College canteen or bring their own)
1.00 Copyright at Clare College – Robert Athol, Clare College, Cambridge
1.30 The John Clare Archive –  Richard Hunt, Peterborough City Archives
2.00 Copyright Infringement: a practical case study – Chris Bennett, Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies
2.30 Case studies workshop
3.00 Tea break (refreshments provided)
3.15 Discussion of case studies –   with Tim Padfield
3.45 Question and Answer session – with Tim, Robert, Richard and Chris
4.00 Close

 

Bookings open for ARA 2014 Conference

Bookings are open for the 2014 Archives and Records Association Conference, which takes place in Newcastle from 27 to 29 August. The theme is: ‘Survival of the fittest: strengths, skills and priorities for 2014 and beyond’.

You can see the latest programme – keep in touch as more is added all the time –  and book online at  www.archives.org.uk

The conference has its popular ‘Archives and Records’ and ‘Conservation’ streams throughout the three days.

An early bird booking discount is available until 21 April.

Caroline Brown, Chair of the Conference Committee says: ‘We’re delighted to announce that Rick Prelinger will be a keynote speaker at the conference. Rick is an archivist, writer and filmmaker, founder of the Prelinger Archives and an Internet Archive board member. Rick’s interests are in personal and institutional record keeping, access to the cultural record, media and social change, digital and participatory archives and cinema and public history.

‘The following quotations demonstrate how much Rick has to say on the theme of our conference that is of relevance to archivists, records managers and conservators.

•       ‘Access means making it as simple and inexpensive for anyone, anywhere, anytime to access copies of works … I think we should define access expansively and generously ’
•       ‘I think we’re not being Utopian enough, we are reactive. We react to things that people do in other fields’
•       ‘I don’t see us coming to terms with technology. This is not a critical statement, it is a wake-up call’
•       ‘I realize I am stating the obvious but I’m not sure that everybody in the world realises that wonderful and unpredictable things happen when ordinary people are given access to primary materials’

‘Rick’s understanding of the importance of what we do and his belief in the need for us to be forward thinking and creative in our responses to change suggests his keynote will be provocative, thought provoking and inspiring.’

The ARA  will announce details of bursaries for the conference shortly.

 

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Religious Archives Group Conference 2014: Religious Archives and Universities

Booking is now open for the 2014 RAG conference to be held on 8 May 2014 at Pusey House in Oxford. A full programme may be found on the RAG website here:

 

 

 

and also as an attachment to this email. I’d be grateful if anyone with an appropriate noticeboard could print it out and put it up.

 

A booking form is attached and also available using the link above. These must be returned by Friday 18 April 2014 and no refunds will be given after this date.

 

  • “Some of the most important historical documents charting the history of central Europe in the 20th century are feared lost, after a fire at the state archives of Bosnia-Herzegovina in Sarajevo.

    The archive, which contains mostly documents from 1878 to 1918, when the Austro-Hungarian ministry of finance was in charge of Bosnia, but also older material from the Ottoman period and documents from the war crimes commission after the second world war, was targeted by protesters on Friday.”

    tags: archives news

  • “Some of the most important historical documents charting the history of central Europe in the 20th century are feared lost, after a fire at the state archives of Bosnia-Herzegovina in Sarajevo.

    The archive, which contains mostly documents from 1878 to 1918, when the Austro-Hungarian ministry of finance was in charge of Bosnia, but also older material from the Ottoman period and documents from the war crimes commission after the second World War, was targeted by protesters on Friday.”

    tags: archives

  • “WASHINGTON — Some lawmakers are trying to prevent the return to Baghdad of a cache of Iraqi Jewish community records, which were seized by the U.S. military during the Iraq war and occupation.

    The Senate on Thursday unanimously backed a bipartisan resolution introduced by Sen. Patrick Toomey (R–Pa.) that urged the State Department to reconsider returning the artifacts to Iraq.”

    tags: archives

  • “A number of documents belonging to the Ottoman era were seriously damaged in a fire in the presidential office in Sarajevo.

    A series of protests in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina turned into nationwide violence over the weekend. Protesters across Bosnia set fire to many government buildings including presidential building.

    The archives executive, Saban Zahırovic, said that many historical documents, rulings, and microfilms had been damaged. Zahirovic described the incident as a crime against the country’s culture and history. “

    tags: archives

  • “At the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, 24 items from the Iraqi Jewish Archive have just gone on display. I attended the February 3 opening of the exhibit, entitled “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” It included a 16th century Hebrew Bible, a hand-lettered Passover Haggadah from 1902, and a 1967 school transcript for an Iraqi Jewish boy. These items weren’t just beautiful to behold. They were also deeply political.”

    tags: archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Archival Science

 

 

Call for Papers

Special Issue on ‘Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving’

 

 

Guest Editors:

 

Ben Alexander, Queens College, City University of New York

 

Andrew Flinn, University College London, University of London

 

 

Although archiving the records of political activism, particularly grassroots activism, is not a new practice, it has often been a controversial and contested process resulting in informal and autonomous activist archival endeavours as well as collections in more orthodox higher education and other local and national specialist archival repositories. In recent years the collection, preservation and the promotion of the use of activist collections for historical research and for ‘social justice’ or ‘human rights’ struggles has become increasingly prevalent in the formal archival sector as well as amongst the growing numbers of independent and autonomous archival endeavours. This explicit alignment with political activism and social justice objectives is not without its critics within the recordkeeping profession, but the archiving of activism and an activist archival approach goes beyond notions of the ‘active archivist’ and instead embraces an understanding of archival practice as (by its very nature) a form of social, cultural, and political activism. Although not necessarily synonymous, these developments come at a time when notions of a more active, collaborative and participatory archival practice are gaining currency in the professional archival world, sharing perhaps an understanding of the power of the democratisation of the production and creation of knowledge.

 

 

Accordingly, this special issue of Archival Science “Archiving Activism and Activist Archiving” will explore the varied connections between contemporary archival practice and activism in many different contexts (national, political, socio-economic, technological, autonomous and formal). This special issue will be guest edited by Ben Alexander, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at Queens College, The City University of New York benjamin.alexander@qc.cuny.edu and Andrew Flinn, Department of Information Studies, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University College London, a.flinn@ucl.ac.uk. Questions about the special issue can be direct to Drs. Alexander and Flinn.

 

 

Suggested topics for papers may include:

 

 how do mainstream archives and archivists work to preserve activist struggles of the past (such as the civil rights movement in the American South, struggles for equality and against discrimination, radical political movements of the left and right as well as across divided and antagonistic communities);

 

 how the constitution of archives and the active ‘use’ of the past history is considered by archival activists to be a core component of their political activities;

 

 how global moves to ensure preservation and use of the documentation of social and political atrocities (including genocide, human rights abuses and repressive regimes) in Truth and Reconciliation, criminal tribunals and other social justice processes has increasingly

 

 involved archivists as key active participants in on-going struggles for Human Rights and

 

Justice.

 

 the impact of technology in promoting the collection, sharing and use of activist histories and for promoting a sense of a more collaborative and participatory approach to the production of ‘useful’ knowledge

 

 the implications of a social justice or human rights orientation to archival practice for the traditional professional adherence to political neutrality

 

 

Key Dates

 

Submission Deadline for completed papers: May 16, 2014

 

Submission instructions

 

Papers submitted to this special issue for possible publication must be original and must not be under consideration for publication in any other journal or conference. Previously published or accepted conference/workshop papers must contain at least 30% new material to be considered for the special issue (for workshops 50% new content is required). Submissions should be made online via the Editorial Manager System at http://www.editorialmanager.com/arcs/.

 

During submission please select article type “SI: Archiving Activism”. All manuscripts must be prepared according to the journal publication guidelines which can also be found on the website http://www.springer.com/10502. Papers will be reviewed following the journal standard peer review process (double-blind).

 

ICA Annual Conference 2014, Girona, Spain, 13-15 October 2014: Call for presentations


The ICA 2014 Annual Conference Joint Programme Committee is seeking presentations from speakers who can lead ICA members and stakeholders in debates on the following themes:
Cultural and creative industries, and strategies of collaboration with archives
Actions and initiatives
Archives and web portals
Access to information
Digital repositories and authenticity preservation in the Cloud
Open data projects
Business models for digital preservation and custody
175th Anniversary of Photography

Deadline for proposals: 28th February 2014
Acceptance of proposals: 30th April 2014
Deadline for texts submission (web): 1st September 2014

Further information about how to register and give your presentation is available on the official Annual Conference 2014 website: http://www.girona.cat/web/ica2014/eng/comunicacions.php

Originally posted on Facet Publishing:

This presentation takes you chapter-by-chapter through Caroline Brown’s new edited collection, Archives and Recordkeeping: Theory into Practice.

View original

We thought you might like to know that PrestoCentre has published new training material for archives called: “Preservation Case Studies for Archives”. The Case Studies have been written by Jim Lindner and Mick Newnham.

Preservation Case Studies for Archives is a new, innovative educational experience. It places the archival student in the role of the decision maker, where one has to balance both resources and constraints. Through a dynamic process of idea exchange, students first learn about the situation, then identify and analyse the problems to determine the causes, and finally develop alternative strategies for a solution.

For more information see www.prestocentre.org/casestudies


PrestoCentre Foundation

PO Box 1060
1200 BB Hilversum
The Netherlands

Tel. +31 20 894 3570 / +1 347 404 5337
Skype: PrestoCentre
Website: http://www.prestocentre.org

A reminder that the deadline for submission is 30th December 2013. One of the speakers commented on last year’s conference ‘I had a wonderful time throughout, the presentations were all thought-provoking, and it was a pleasure to present and receive feedback from such an engaged audience’. That could be you in Newcastle!

 


Archives and Records Association Annual Conference 

 

NEWCASTLE, United Kingdom

 

27th – 29th August 2014

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Deadline for submission 30th December 2013

 

 

‘Survival of the Fittest: strengths, skills and priorities for 2014 and beyond’

 

This century has seen rapid changes in how we create, use, disseminate and access information. Increased interactions between states, organisations and societies have raised questions about the creation, recording and control of information.  Individuals and communities are remembering and communicating in different ways and records and archives are being used in new and increasingly creative environments. Archivists, records managers and conservators are uniquely placed to react to these developments and to use their strengths to manage and preserve the records and archives of today and the future. However, are these strengths fit for purpose? Do we need to learn new skills or to change our priorities? How can we survive and thrive?  Is there a role for us as professionals in the future?

 

 

 

The Archives and Records Association UK & Ireland invites proposals for papers, presentations and workshops on these themes for its annual conference to be help in Newcastle, August, 2014.

 

 

 

The conference will have two streams (archives and records management / conservation). We welcome suggestions for papers, panels, case studies, debates and workshops on the following areas.  There may also be opportunities for poster presentations, proposals for these should be submitted as below.

 

 

·         What are the core skills of the profession? How have they changed?

 

·         What new skills do we need and how can we acquire them?

 

·         With so many different skills will the future see specialists rather than generalists?

 

·         How do we articulate our value and impact?

 

·         How do we make the most of changes in organisations and technology?

 

·         What impact do new ways of creating and using records have?

 

·         How do we manage digital records and archives?

 

·         Is the profession just about managing risk? Or promoting well-being?

 

·         Is there a difference between records managers, archivists and information professionals?

 

·         How important are shared services and partnerships?

 

·         How can we be creative about what we do?

 

·         How do we prioritise for posterity?

 

·         What is the role of research and theory?

 

 

The programme is flexible and session lengths will be decided once papers have been chosen but please note that individual speakers will generally have no longer than 30 minutes for their presentations.

 

 

Submitting your proposal:

 

 

 

Please submit your proposal, in the format suggested below, to:

 

 

 

Caroline Brown (Archives and Records Management stream)

 

Chair, ARA Conference 2014

 

c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

 

01382 388773

 

 

 

Mark Allen (Conservation stream)

 

mark_allen@flintshire.gov.uk

 

01244 532 364

 

 

 

The deadline for submission of proposals is:  30th December 2013.

 

Submissions will be considered by the Programme Sub-committee in December, and invitations to speak will be confirmed by the Committee by February 2014. Speakers will be reimbursed travel expenses and will receive free conference registration for the day on which they are speaking. International speakers will be reimbursed travel expenses within the UK only.

 

 

●            Try to connect your proposal to the theme of the conference as best you can. The theme is designed for speakers to bring topics to light that touch on contemporary issues

 

●            Try to be creative with your paper! How will your paper stimulate debate?

 

●            Please provide as full information as you can about your proposal – this helps the Committee in making choices about papers and scheduling of sessions

 

●            Try to be relevant and representative: consider looking at a topic from opposing viewpoints, or focus on the broader picture rather than institutionally specific ones

 

●             If you are considering making a group submission for a session, try to mix speakers from different backgrounds and institutions, or try to include a user or customer perspective

 

 

 

Your proposal should include the following:

 

 

 

-                      Name of proposer (or lead contact for group proposals)

 

-                      Institution

 

-                      Contact details

 

Address

 

Telephone

 

Email

 

Fax

 

-                      Submission title (or working title)

 

-                      Speakers (if a panel session)

 

-                      Session description (brief description, max 250 words)

 

-                      Brief biography/ies of speakers

 

-                      Special equipment needed (AV equipment etc)

 

-                      Any other information

 

 

 

 

 

For further information, or if you have any further questions, please

 

contact:

 

 

 

Caroline Brown

 

Chair, ARA Conference 2014

e-mail:  c.z.brown@dundee.ac.uk

 

Royal Voluntary Service is pleased to announce that it has updated its online catalogue, extending the index of our WVS Narrative Reports (inscribed on the UNESCO UK memory of the World register) up to the year 1955.

This represents, 5,851 new entries which cover c.25,000 individual reports from around the UK.

The catalogue, launched in January this year, already contained entries for 5,000 images (including over 1,000 preview images) and 80,000 of our Narrative reports from 1938-1945.

This is part of a two year £52K cataloguing project funded by Royal Voluntary Service (due to reach completion in March 2014) which hopes to catalogue and repackage all of our reports up to 1965. It is part of our ongoing development programme to grant greater access to our nationally and internationally important collection.

You can access the catalogue via our website, by visiting www.royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk/our-history and clicking on the catalogue link in the menu.

You can obtain copies of any of our Narrative Reports by making an enquiry through our free enquiry service, details of which you can find in the ‘our History’ section of our website.

 

I am very pleased to announce the launch of a new ICA-sponsored multilingual database of archival terminology. The product of several years’ hard work by many people, this resource aims to serve as a dynamic, collaborative, cross-referential dictionary and index of archival concepts and terminology as expressed through different languages, cultures, and ways of thinking about records.

Never again will you have to ask yourself “how do you say ‘fonds’ in English?” – which is, of course, a trick question.

Read more here:

http://icarchives.webbler.co.uk/14282/ica-multilingual-archival-terminology/ica-multilingual-archival-terminology.html

We are delighted to announce the launch of the online catalogue of the British Red Cross Museum and Archives. The collection provides a fascinating insight into our humanitarian work from our beginnings in 1870 as the British National Society for Aid to the Sick and Wounded in War, to our continuing vital contribution in today’s society. 

 

 

New catalogue entries will be added at regular intervals but please could you let your readers know that this resource is now available.

 

For access to the catalogue or for more general information about the Museum and Archives including our research services, historical factsheets and online exhibitions please visit the following site:

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/Museum-and-archives

 

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar 2014: The Global Archive

When: Friday, 28 February 2014

 

Where: The Chancellors Hall, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, London

 

Hosted by The Royal Historical Society, the Institute of Historical Research, The National Archives and the University of Leicester

 

Attendance is free but numbers will be limited; please reply to research@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk to reserve a place. The full programme will be available shortly.

 

In recent years, there has been a turn to the global across the humanities and social sciences, including in the discipline of History.  Global history has been taken to mean many things, and can encompass world, transnational, postcolonial and connected and comparative approaches to the study of the past. But what are the implications of this widening of research beyond traditional national or area studies frameworks for archives? How does it impact on the way in which archivists view their collections, and how historians use them? How best can UK archives support global history? And how do their collections relate to the need for multi-sited research that doing global history implies? Does global history imply an expansion of the historian’s traditional archive, and the incorporation of other traces of the past, such as through oral history or ethnographies of commemoration? And, how does the global turn cause us to look differently at, and generate new uses for, the collections in UK archives? These are some of the questions that we will explore in this year’s Gerald Aylmer Seminar.

 

Call for contributions: Special Issue of ‘Archives and Records’ on visual arts archives

 

Recent years have seen a rise in the profile of the visual arts archive.  From a specialist sector, the field has become a site of rich convergence for many current issues affecting archives, such as interdisciplinary encounters with notions of the archive, and the archive as a site of creative practice.   Contributions are invited to a special issue of Archives and Records (formerly the Journal of the Society of Archivists) on the theme of the visual arts archive.   Articles might consider aspects of this field of archival practice, or engage with discussions about visual arts archives that have taken place outside the archival profession.  The issue particularly seeks to foster interdisciplinary debate, so contributions are encouraged from within and outside the archival profession, especially where they engage with aspects of archival practice.

Over the past decade, many academic journals have produced special issues on the Archive.  This special issue seeks to reach in the opposite direction, outwards from the archive to the field of visual culture.  The visual arts sector has seen particularly rich interdisciplinary exchanges and discourses about archives.  Increasingly, archivists have entered these critical and philosophical debates and enriched the dialogue using archivaltheory and practice, which has often been under-represented.  Meanwhile, the role of the archivist, like that of the curator, has experienced a dissolving of its boundaries, its field of practice explored by those from a range of perspectives interested in the stewardship of visual arts archives, in both digital and analogue forms.

In particular, 2013 has seen a number of events that indicate the pertinence of this field of enquiry for a special issue of Archives and Records, with several conferences and symposia organized both within and outside the archival profession.  A book, All that Stuff: Archiving the Artist, has been published by the ARLIS Committee for Art + Design Archives, the culmination of a strand of innovative interdisciplinary work which started with events at Tate Britain in 2007 and 2009.  Meanwhile, The National Archives’ strategic initiative ‘Archiving the Arts’ has launched, aiming “to ensure that the records of art in the UK are well cared for and accessible, and that their value is recognized”.

We invite papers reflecting on any aspect of archival practice in visual arts archives.  Contributions might consider, but are not confined to, the following themes:

•          Interdisciplinary perspectives on visual arts archives

•          Building relationships with art and design practitioners and organisations

•          Alternative archival practices of visual arts archives

•          Defining the archival object in the visual arts environment: non-traditional archival forms

•          New technologies in visual arts records, their collection, management and preservation

•          Copyright and intellectual property rights in art and design environments

•          Value in visual arts archives, which might include monetary and reputational values

•          Hidden or under-researched visual arts materials

Prospective authors are invited to contact the Editor of this special issue, Sue Breakell (s.m.breakell@brighton.ac.uk) to discuss potential articles.  The deadline for submissions is 31st July 2014.   All submissions will be double blind peer-reviewed and should be presented in line with Archives and Records style guidelines, available at http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cjsa20&page=instructions#.Un9ccCefauI

Voices and the Archive: Oral History Research and Researchers

20 November 2013, London

The trend to re-use qualitative data in the social sciences is now well-established though the use of oral history archives is less widespread. As part of the NOVELLA (Narratives of Varied Everyday Life and Linked Approaches) programme, based at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, we have been using different narrative archival sources, such as diaries and oral history, to study the habitual, everyday food practices of families in hard times.

This one day seminar about using oral history data forms part of the Novella project. Through a series of presentations and audience-led discussion the seminar will examine the issues raised by the creation and use of oral history archives in social science research, from the perspectives of academics, archivists and community oral historians. Questions to be addressed include: who are the creators and users of oral history? How is oral history used by social scientists, historians, archivists and community oral historians? What makes oral history sources different from other qualitative data and what challenges does the creation and use of oral history raise? Speakers include Paul Thompson, Joanna Bornat, Graham Smith, and Jane Renouf and will be chaired by Lord Clark of Windermere. The event will be of relevance to researchers and archivists interested in creating and using oral history archives for social scientific research.

‘Voices and the Archive’ (10.30 am 4.30 pm) will be held in Central London, with registration from 10 am. The cost of attendance includes refreshments on arrival, lunch and afternoon tea. Places are limited and offered on a first come first served basis.

‘Voices and the Archive’ is hosted by NOVELLA (Narratives of Varied Everyday Lives and Linked Approaches) in collaboration with the UK Data Service. NOVELLA is an ESRC funded, National Centre for Research Methods Phase III node concerned with the everyday habitual practices of families.

To book a place on this event please visit our online store.

 

Originally posted on Refugee Archives and History Group:

For Refugee Week UK 2013 (17th-23rd June 2013) we looked at the contributions of refugees to our history and heritage. We decided to create a time-line and ‘living archive’ which acknowledges these contributions.

The time-line is at its early stages and we hope that, with your involvement, it will grow, develop and celebrate all our similarities and difference. It is a participatory ‘living archive’, which means that with your perspectives and input it will keep changing and improving, ensuring that we acknowledge and record our full and diverse history and heritage. We also hope that you will find it useful and as fascinating as we do!

Image

Did you know, for example, that the UK has been offering protection to refugees for hundreds of years? That refugees and their descendants have had significant contributions to our arts, science, sports and literature? That refugees co-designed Hampton Court Palace, helped establish the Bank…

View original 103 more words

Re-blog from the Guardian Online - The cost of historical research: why archives need to move with the times

The cost of historical research: why archives need to move with the times

The variable fees charged to access original documents risk putting archival research out of general reach, says Nell Darby.

Should researchers be charged additional fees to take photographs of archived material? Photograph: Uriel Sinai/Getty Images

As county archives face continued financial pressure on their services, history researchers are facing increasing difficulty in accessing original archival documents. Reduced and often complex opening arrangements, fewer staff and closures over lunch periods makes pre-planning an inevitable part of the archival research process.

Archives appear to be using fees to plug gaps in their finances – and these can often be idiosyncratic. Day passes are issued for users to photograph documents to transcribe later from home or university. These can vary in price from £2 at Birmingham to £25 at North Yorkshire County Record OfficeBerkshire Record Office charges £1 per image and for those needing access to long documents, the cost can become prohibitive. This includes me. I am researching 18th-century magistrates’ notebooks, which can run to hundreds of pages of dense text.

These fees matter. Archivists are not the only ones under financial pressure – researchers are too. Research students have limited budgets and are increasingly time-strapped. Transcribing documents in record offices is time consuming and taking photographs to access documents in our own time is invaluable. It means less time spent using record office resources, yet we are being charged inconsistent amounts to use our own cameras.

The costs and difficulties in accessing archival documents is having an impact on history researchers who may feel that it is too hard to access these documents, and instead rely on more limited sources or digitised resources. In doing so, they miss out on a wealth of information and the quality of research suffers.

I raised this subject on Twitter where it received a significant response among professional researchers, academics and students. My own supervisor at the University of Northampton, Drew Gray, criticised the charges at Berkshire Record Office, pointing out that “even the British Library’s copying service is better value”.

Gray added: “There should be a standard charge and it should be fair and reflect costs, otherwise it penalises researchers without considerable funding behind them, which is elitist.” This was also a point raised by Cathryn Pearce of Greenwich Maritime Institute, who argued that it was “very elitist to only allow the rich or funded to take photos for research. Many of us doing good work … can’t afford that”.

Louise Falcini, an 18th-century historian based at the University of Reading, pointed out that the National Archives allows all researchers to photograph documents for free. She said: “I took almost 500 photographs at the National Archives – all for research purposes. £500 wouldn’t have been an option.”

Lucy Bailey, another PhD student at the University of Northampton, had hoped to photograph a Victorian shop account book on her visit to Berkshire Record Office, in order to transcribe it in her own time from home. Surprised at the £1 per image cost, Bailey queried the reasoning behind it with a county archivist who responded: “We charge a unit rate rather than a daily rate simply because we believe that it better reflects what a user is acquiring. It seems to us analogous to making printouts from microfilm or from a digitised image and to the supply of photocopies, where the charge is directly related to the number of copies supplied.”

What Berkshire’s price structure fails to recognises that a researcher photographing documents costs the archive less than if they requested copies or spent days sitting in the archive transcribing material. Using your own camera and asking an archivist to photocopy documents are simply not analogous.

A survey conducted by Lucy Bailey looking at self-service photography costs levied by county archives across England, showed a striking lack of consistency. Hampshire Archives charge £12.50 for a daily camera pass, and East Sussex £15, second only to North Yorkshire’s £25. Conversely,Herefordshire ArchivesDevon Heritage Centre and North Devon Record Office charge only £3 per day. Yet some other regional archives, including Northumberland and North East Lincolnshire, continue to let researchers photograph documents for free.

Archivists argue that photograph fees should be seen as separate to research fees – one pointed out on Twitter that “research is still free even when photography is not”. Luci Gosling, historical specialist for theMary Evans Picture Library, says researchers should bear in mind that many archive charges are funnelled back into maintaining or improving the resources or facilities of the archive itself.

It is the age of the digital historian. Technology gives researchers the means of carrying out their work more effectively and quickly, and archivists need to respond positively to these changes. Without encouraging researchers to use and disseminate their material, archive buildings risk becoming populated only by those with the incomes to be able to indulge in research – and we will all be poorer for it.

Nell Darby is a doctoral research student in history at the University of Northampton – follow her on Twitter @nelldarby

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To get more articles like this direct to your inbox, become a member ofthe Higher Education Network.

 

Originally posted on UKHRG - UK Heritage Research Group:

Envisioning the library of the future
Arts Council England, May 2013

Envisioning the library of the future, a major research project undertaken over the past year, has been published. The research will help library staff, funders and users to better understand what libraries could and should look like in the future.
Valued services: The research has found that public libraries are trusted spaces, open to all, in which people continue to explore and share the joys of reading, information, knowledge and culture. People will continue to value the services that libraries provide in the future.

Challenges ahead: Envisioning the library of the future also indicates public libraries face many challenges in the coming years, including: advances in technology, which affect the ways in which people want to connect to information and culture; reduced public expenditure; the increasing involvement of citizens in the design and delivery of public services; and the needs of…

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Members of the East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) yesterday passed a motion condemning the UN system for failing “to prevent the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi despite having received reports to that effect.”

The motion, moved by MP Abubakar Zein Abubakar [Kenya], also declared the Assembly’s support for “the decision of the Council of Ministers to ensure that all the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR ) be transferred to Rwanda.”

While addressing the lawmakers on Tuesday, President Paul Kagame, called for deepening of regional integration across Africa to boost the continent’s ability to stand for its rights.

Yesterday’s sitting was the actual plenary business for the fifth meeting of the first session of the third Assembly that runs from Tuesday until April 26 in Kigali.

The motion was seconded by MP Abubakar Ogle [Kenya], before it got the House’s unanimous approval.

Apart from expressing profound disappointment with the failure of the UN to prevent the Genocide, EALA declared “its solidarity with the people and Government of Rwanda especially now when they are commemorating the 1994 Genocide.

The Assembly appreciates the resilience of the people and Government of the Republic of Rwanda in copying with the legacy of Genocide on their own for the last 19 years, the legislators said in a statement.

The resolution demands the Council of Ministers to designate April 7 of every year as the EAC Day of Reflection on the Genocide against the Tutsi.

It calls on EAC Partner States to commemorate the Genocide; and act in accordance with the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of genocide by putting in place necessary mechanisms to track and bring Genocide fugitives to justice.

In addition, it calls on the EAC to enact laws punishing and negating the crime of genocide denial and propagating hate speeches embodying genocide ideology.

The resolution calls upon the EAC Summit (of Heads of State) to urge the UN to adopt a Resolution establishing an International Trust Fund for Survivors of the Genocide against the Tutsi and that the EAC do organise a Regional Conference to address the issues of Genocide as part of the 20th commemoration of the Genocide, next year.

via allAfrica.com: Rwanda: EALA Backs Rwanda’s Quest for ICTR Archives (Page 1 of 2).

via allAfrica.com: Rwanda: EALA Backs Rwanda’s Quest for ICTR Archives (Page 1 of 2).

On Wednesday East African Legislative Assembly (EALA) parliamentarians passed a motion declaring their institution’s support for the decision of the Council of Ministers to ensure that all the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) be transferred to Rwanda.

It is extremely unfortunate and frustrating that Rwandans are still being forced to agitate for this essential part of our own history. Make no mistake; those archives are our history.

They document the planning, execution and aftermath of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. They reveal the legal process in which the architects of the more than a million deaths faced justice.

They document the crimes that monsters like genocidal regime Prime Minister Jean Kambanda, Jean Paul Akayesu and the virulent Theoneste Bagosora committed.

It is simply mind-boggling that the archives would find another home. Where else would they be as valued? Where else would they provide such a lesson to the citizenry?

Placing the archives in any other hands would be a slap in the face of all Rwandans. The EALA realises this and so does the East African Community. The United Nations system must not betray Rwandans the way it did 19 years ago.

via allAfrica.com: East Africa: The ICTR Archives Belong to Rwandans.

via allAfrica.com: East Africa: The ICTR Archives Belong to Rwandans.

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

News release from The National Archives:

We are working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) to transfer and begin releasing colonial administration records, referred to as the ‘migrated archives’ between April 2012 and November 2013. This is in accordance with FCO’s published timeline on GOV.UK

The fifth tranche will be made available in the reading rooms at The National Archives from Friday 26 April 2013. The collection forms record series FCO 141: Foreign and Commonwealth Office and predecessors: Records of Former Colonial Administrations: Migrated Archives.

What the records contain

This release will contain records from Ceylon, Kenya, Malta, Mauritius, New Hebrides, Nigeria, Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, Palestine, Sierra Leone and Singapore.

The records cover a wide range of subject matter relating to colonial administration. The material reflects events in the territories generally pre-independence and the views of Her Majesty’s Government at that time.

Using the records

A guide to…

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The following title has recently been published by Facet:

 

Preserving Archives, 2nd edition

Helen Forde and Jonathan Rhys-Lewis

 

This is a brand new and fully updated edition of this seminal work on archival preservation.

Archivists in all types of organizations face questions on how to plan a preservation strategy in less than perfect circumstances, or deal with a sudden emergency. This book considers the causes of threats to the basic material, outlines the preservation options available and offers flexible solutions applicable in a variety of situations.  It offers a wide range of case studies and examples from international specialists. This revised edition includes additional material on digital preservation and green building as well as a new chapter on the management and training of volunteers, reflecting a key concern for many archival institutions.

Table of contents (PDF): http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/forde-toc.pdf

Sample chapter (PDF): http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/forde-ch1.pdf

More information: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=8231

 

Blog Posting originally published on the Voluntary Action and History Society (VAHS) Blog at:  http://www.vahs.org.uk/2013/04/the-campaign-goes-on/

The Campaign goes on

Posted on April 10, 2013 by Georgina Brewis

Readers of this blog may have noticed a recent rare good news story in the press about charity archives. After several years of protracted negotiation, the records of leading development organisation Oxfam are to be donated to the Bodleian Library in Oxford, thanks to a major cataloguing grant from the Wellcome Trust.

This is excellent news, and we hope there is more to come. Following a successful launch at the House of Lords in October 2012, the Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives published its first draft guidance in March. The Keeping it Simple guide, aimed at small voluntary organisations, was put together by Co-ordinating Editor Philip Gale of The National Archives, with the input of voluntary organisations, historians and archivists. This is the first of what the Campaign intends as a series of documents offering practical advice to the creators and users of archives of the voluntary sector. Please do submit your comments on this guidance by 1 June 2013.

The ARA’s Archive Volunteering Award 2013 also presents a chance to recognise the contribution of volunteers to the charity archive sector. Last year the award was won by Wolverhampton City Archives, but leading charity archive WRVS received a special ‘highly commended’ award, designed to recognise the immense work of its volunteers in sorting, cataloguing and digitising its collection, enabling the re-opening of the enquiry service and launch of an online catalogue in January 2013. Perhaps a voluntary sector archive could win this year? Nominations close on 7 June 2013. In another coup for charity archives, the Planned Environment Therapy Trust Archive and Study Centre has been named Family History Magazine’s ‘Archive of the Year’.

Since its launch the Campaign has made contact with a number of interested parties in England, as well as in Canada, Australia and Northern Ireland who are similarly concerned with the plight of the records of charities, voluntary organisations and pressure groups. Meanwhile, working with members of the Campaign, the VAHS New Researchers Group is planning a workshop on using the archives and records of voluntary organisations later this year. Watch this space for more information.

Do you have a good news story about voluntary sector archives you’d like to share? Or a tale of a charity’s records under threat? The Campaign for Voluntary Sector Archives is keen to involve a greater range of stakeholders, so do get in touch.

The British Records Association:

 

 ‘ARCHIVES AT RISK’: SEMINAR AT THE BRITISH LIBRARY, WEDNESDAY 8 MAY 2013, 2-4.45pm

 

The British Records Association is holding an afternoon seminar (1.30pm for 2pm) on its recently published report about risks currently threatening historical records and archives.  For details of the report please go to http://www.britishrecordsassociation.org.uk/pages/news.htm

 

The purpose of the seminar is to consider the issues raised by the report and the actions needed to tackle them.  The report highlighted generic risks and made a variety of proposals for further co-ordinated work to enhance the collection and preservation of both digital and traditional archive formats.  Short presentations will be given by Anthony Smith (British Records Association), Caroline Peach (British Library Preservation Advisory Centre), Melinda Haunton (The National Archives) and David Mander (Independent Consultant).

 

There will be plenty of opportunity for questions about the report as well as wider discussion on the feasibility of the proposals.  This event will be of interest to anyone who is concerned about current strategic and practical issues facing the proper preservation of the UK’s rich archival heritage and the variety of archive services that contribute to managing that heritage.

 

We would like the afternoon to provide the basis for an action plan and are very keen to make use of the occasion to hear from anyone who would be willing to address the issues raised by the report.

 

Attendance at the seminar is free and light refreshments will be provided on arrival, but places are limited.  Please book your place by contacting Maria Evans, British Records Association, Finsbury Library, 245 St John’s Street, London EC1V 4NB (info@britishrecordsassociation.org.uk; 0207 8330428) before Thursday 2 May 2013.

 

The Association welcomes constructive feedback and comment from readers of its report.  If you wish to comment on it, please contact the Chairman of the Association’s Records Preservation Section at rps@britishrecordsassociation.org.uk

 

Annual Conference

“Community as Archives, Archives as Community

ACA’s 38th Annual Conference – June 13-15, 2013 – Delta Winnipeg Hotel, Winnipeg, MB

Communities are the framework of our identities, our history and our lives. Online and offline, connected by geography, ethnicity, language, sexuality, interests, professions, friendship and kin, our lives are a lattice of communities.

Join us in Winnipeg, a city of communities and meeting places, for an exploration of how archival consciousness arises in communities and how community consciousness has arisen among archivists.

This year’s conference not only promises a thoroughly stimulating and engaging program, but also offers opportunities to join colleagues in experiencing Winnipeg’s irrepressible community spirit.  Social events will highlight a few of the unique eccentricities, charms, and attractions of Winnipeg and surrounding area.  Or you can explore what the city has to offer on your own!

ACA 2013 will allow you to be connected to the conference and your colleagues like never before, through Facebook, Twitter, and the ACA website.  And the ACA 2013 app will ensure that you have all the conference information you require no matter where you and your mobile device may be.

The ACA 2013 conference hotel is the Delta Winnipeg.  Among its many features are a central location in downtown Winnipeg within walking distance of many of the city’s attractions, a rooftop pool, excellent dining, a fantastic lounge, and strong Wi-Fi throughout the guest rooms and conference facilities.

The Call for Student Papers and a Call for Poster Submissions are now closed.

The preliminary 2013 Conference at a Glance is now available.  Conference information appears on the pages/screens in this section while additional information will be added as the sessions and social activities are developed and confirmed. See What’s New and Important Dates for more information.

Click this link for information about Past Conferences.  Proceedings from recent ACA Conferences are available in the Members’ Only area.

We look forward to you joining us in Winnipeg for ACA 2013!

Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

From the Institute of Race Relations:

Why the voluntary sector is under threat

Written by Jenny Bourne

A report into the independence of the voluntary sector holds important lessons for groups struggling for funding and their very existence.

The voluntary sector is under threat. So, who cares, you might reply, everything is up for grabs these days. It is not enough to throw up ones hands and see the demise of the Third Sector as inevitable or unimportant or nothing to do with politics. To have a strong, independent voluntary sector is the lifeblood of struggles for justice. It is the sector which can campaign for change, can articulate the voices of the unheard and powerless, take on the ‘unpopular’ issues and challenge orthodoxies. But to do those things it has to be independent and truly distanced from both centres of power and private profit. And in both these areas…

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Originally posted on Refugee Archives @ UEL:

Re-blogged from the Voluntary Action History Society:

The symbiotic relationship between the humanitarian sector and those who document its work is by no means an easy one. This point seems likely to be made again with Fatal Assistance, a documentary by Raoul Peck due to screen in London on Saturday as part of the Human Rights Watch film festival. It offers a critique of relief efforts in Haiti following the devastating earthquake of 2010.

For UK viewers, Peck’s film comes off the back of a feature-length piece – tellingly entitled The Trouble with Aid – screened by the BBC late last year. Made with the cooperation of key figures from the humanitarian sector, it portrayed fifty years of humanitarian aid as a story of manipulation and compromise. This clip discussing the camps for Rwandan refugees following the 1994 genocide gives a sense of the filmmakers’ approach:

Link…

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I am writing to remind everyone about the workshop and lecture on 8 March 2013 by Professor Maria Tamboukou from the Centre for Narrative Research, University of East London.

If you would like more information about these events, please email novella@ioe.ac.uk.  If you would like to book onto either the workshop or lecture, please click on the web links below.

 

The thick autonomy of archival research (Workshop, 1-4pm)
Room G16, 9-11 Endsleigh Gardens In recent years archival research in the social sciences is emerging as a vibrant field of qualitative research, but despite a relatively small body of literature that has been slowly amassing around it (see Stanley 2011, Valles et al 2011), it still remains a relatively underdeveloped field outside the humanities. In this workshop we will look into questions of archival sensibility in social sciences research and explore a range of methodological approaches, epistemological standpoints and concerns, as well as theoretical questions and issues.

Drawing on Casey’s influential suggestion about the ‘thick autonomy of memory’ (2000) the archive is configured not just as a discursively constructed memory space, but also as a material assemblage, a laboratory of memory with specific spatio/temporal rhythms that significantly influence mnemonic practices in the study and writing of memory. The workshop will draw on specific case studies from archival research that Professor Maria Tamboukou has conducted in a number of archives in the UK and abroad over the last ten years, informed by neo-materialist approaches in feminist science studies. (see Tamboukou 2010)

http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=147&deptid=112&catid=42

 

Gendering the memory of work (Lecture, 5-7pm)
Drama Studio, Institute of Education

 

Over the past thirty years feminist theorists have drawn on women’s auto/biographical narratives to include them in the canonical texts of literary criticism, to rewrite social and cultural histories but also to understand and theorise the constitution of the gendered self in modernity. But if one looks into the rich body of scholarship around women’s auto/biographical narratives, there is very little theorisation on working women’s auto/biographies from a sociological perspective, although there is a substantial body of work in literary criticism (see Coiner 1995, Zandy1990). Even among the few notable exceptions (Hollis 2004, Stanley 1984, Swindells 1995) the seamstress seems to be a figure that has yet to be studied and analysed. It seems that working women in general and seamstresses in particular had very little time in their hands to write but did they really?

Professor Maria Tamboukou’s review of the literature has revealed a range of very interesting autobiographical documents that span diverse geographical, ethnic, racial and cultural backgrounds To be sure, seamstresses’ narratives or rather extracts of them have been widely used as illustrations and points of reference for many studies around women’s work in a wide range of disciplinary fields. However seamstresses’ narratives have never been analysed as ‘documents of life’ (Plummer 2001). It is this significant gap in the literature on women’s lives that Tamboukou’s research addresses, particularly focusing on the memory of work and its role in the constitution of female subjectivities. In this lecture Professor Tamboukou will present some of the emergent themes as well as a tentative framework for theorising gendered aspects in the memory of work.

http://store.ioe.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=146&deptid=112&catid=42

 

Originally posted on UCA Archives:

Presenting the Tessa Boffin Archive at Brave New World

On the 16th February 2013 at the London Metropolitan archives LGBT conference, held at the stunning architectural and design surroundings of Guildhall, UCA Archives presented the Tessa Boffin archive, a Photographer specialising in LGBT issues including cross dressing,which looks at gender identity, and photographic responses to AIDS, alongside professional Photographer, Rebecca Andrews’, recen, around 2000, female body builder images. Andrews also looked at ways that gender identity can be portrayed (looking at Tessa Boffin’s 1980s archive and her own recent body builder work)

See Rebecca Andrews website http://www.rebecca-andrews.co.uk/

See Tessa Boffin Archive http://community.ucreative.ac.uk/article/37974/Tessa-Boffin

Brave New World, Conference

Guildhall art Gallery also has an ongoing exhibition from acclaimed Photographer Ajamu, of under 35 LGBT black British born individuals, Fierce

http://ajamu-fineartphotography.co.uk/2012/01/27/fierce-2/

Themes of the day included Policy – Action and Impact, LGBT History and the Future, Community projects, and Culture and LGBT identity, from a range of passionate speakers

Brave New World Rebecca Andrews  16 February 2013

Brave New World Conference Rebekah Taylor, 16 February 2013

Brave New World Conference Guildhall venue 2, 16 February 2013

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Originally posted on Brunel Special Collections:

A guest post by Dr Claire Lynch.

As a researcher I’ve spent many happy hours, elbow deep in the manuscripts of the
Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiography held here at Brunel. The archive contains over 230 autobiographies by authors born between 1790 and 1945 and
was compiled by John Burnett, David Vincent, and David Mayall. They were
interested in how working class people had written about their own lives and the
texts they collected are rich and varied.

Burnett ArticleMy research looks at this material from a
literary perspective; I’m interested in the techniques these writers have used and the ways they have managed the almost impossible task of capturing life on the page.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been sharing this work with MA students from the English and Creative Writing programmes. For many of the students this is the first opportunity to work with manuscript material so…

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Cartoon by Sally Wesley c.1770 showing parishioners attending church © John Rylands Library. Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester.

Cartoon by Sally Wesley c.1770 showing parishioners attending church © John Rylands Library. Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands University Library, The University of Manchester.

A programme is now available below for our 2013 conference. The cost of the day is £45 including lunch and coffee.

Booking form is available here: RAG Booking Form 2013. Please complete and return this as soon as possible if you would like to attend and certainly by 10 April 2013

RAG Conference 2013: Localism in Religious Archives

London Metropolitan Archives, Friday 26 April 2013

10:20 Registration

10:40 Welcome

10:50 The Archives of the East London Mosque Jamil Sherif, Archivist, East London Mosque

11:25 Coffee

11:45 Using London’s Religious Collections: A Researcher’s Perspective Sarah Flew, The Open University

12:20 Archives of London’s Jewish Organisations Charles Tucker, Record Keeper, United Synagogue

13:00 Lunch

13:45 RAG AGM

14:30 Building Archive Facilities at Exeter Cathedral: Options, Appraisal, Decisions and Practicalities Ann Barwood, Canon Librarian and Ellie Jones, Archivist, Exeter Cathedral

15:15 The Cwm Jesuit Library Project Hannah Thomas, Swansea University

15:50 Wrap up

16:00 Close

 

Originally posted on University of Glasgow Library:

by Nicky Imrie and Sam Gilchrist

LGBTI Human Rights in the Commonwealth conference logo

Conference logo

Preparations for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games have already prompted a huge response of activities, events and discussion, sports-related and beyond. On Friday 18 July, just five days before the start of the Games, the University of Glasgow plays host to a one-day conference on LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex) Human Rights in the Commonwealth in partnership with Pride Glasgow, the Kaleidoscope Trust and the Glasgow Human Rights Network.

Here at the University Archives and Special Collections we felt this was an opportunity to reflect on how or indeed if our collections represent LGBTI rights. We discovered that material dealing directly with advocacy was minimal and was very much focused on the local situation in Scotland and reactions to that here on campus.

Student Handbook 1974 (GUAS: DC157/18/84)

Student Handbook 1974 (GUAS: DC157/18/84)

The annual Glasgow University Student Handbooks, in the archive of the Students’…

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Originally posted on Denbighshire Archives:

The 29th of June 2014 marks the 154th anniversary of one of the most notorious crimes in Victorian England, as described in the 2008 best seller The Suspicions of Mr Whicher by Kate Summerscale. The story details the investigation into the murder of the youngest child of Samuel Saville Kent, Factory Inspector, and his wife Mary, at Road Hill House, Road, on the Somerset/Wiltshire border. The book was subsequently dramatised and produced for television and broadcast in April 2011.

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The murder of Francis Saville Kent shocked and scandalised Victorian society, and caused a major sensation. The boy, aged four, whose body was found the morning after he had been abducted from his cot in the middle of the night, together with the fact that he was a member of a respectable middle class family, and that he had been taken from inside his securely locked, affluent home, meant that the…

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Originally posted on Gloucestershire Archives:

For nigh on twenty years I came here occasionally, sent by archaeologists to look at large maps, and I was always intrigued by the tiny glass-fronted room where the duty archivist watched over us – the goldfish bowl, as the staff call it, apparently. Strange that for more than two years now I have sat in that same room, toiling over parish histories and supervising the Victoria County History (I’ve even heard a whisper that it’s now called the headmaster’s study, but I’m not supposed to know that).

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Originally posted on Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the UK and Republic of Ireland:

One of the things the new edition of the Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland does is to reflect changing curatorial viewpoints. Dunia Garcia-Ontiveros of the London Library writes:

A copy of Henry VIII's reply to Martin Luther's attack on the Roman Catholic Church, with the Allan Library stamp.

A copy of Henry VIII’s reply to Martin Luther’s attack on the Roman Catholic Church, with the Allan Library stamp.

The London Library is above all a lending library. Building a working collection of books, pamphlets and periodicals that members could borrow and read at home has always been our aim and that explains why the vast majority of our stock of over one million volumes is on open access. Still, over the years, and mainly through numerous gifts, we have acquired a collection of around 40,000 volumes that because of their rarity, value, provenance or fragility we keep under lock and key. Because allowing our members to borrow books is so…

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